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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • VINTAGE MIAMI: c. 1960s

Stop-Stop & Go-Go: 1919

Stop-Stop & Go-Go: 1919

Circa 1919. "Traffic officer at 14th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue." Before stoplights in the District of Columbia, there was the "Go-Go" traffic sign equipped with umbrella and rearview mirror. The Willard Hotel and U.S. Treasury play supporting roles in this Harris & Ewing glass negative. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
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Wooden pallet

Standing on the wood will help his joints, especially if he has 8 hours of duty a day at that post.

[It would also keep his feet warm. The ground is a heat sink. - Dave]

Go-Go Boots

Apparently the fashion was started by men and required a 'platform' heel.

Improvement?

Somehow I think traffic might have flowed better with this guy at the intersection than it does today.

Prototype traffic signal controller

It's easy to see how the mirrored platform was the direct predecessor to early street embedded treadle actuated automated traffic light control systems. Subsequent developments however seem bent on removing any resemblance to the original, with things like ultrasonic, street imbedded induction loop, pedestrian demand button and who knows what other kind of sensor/actuators.

Origination of the Term

When one stands in one place too long one can become flat footed.

Early Selfie

"Looking good, my man, looking good."

Mirror, Mirror

on the pole, who's the fairest gendarme of them ole?

Obsolescence

A hard working family man long since replaced by a few million electrons.

As seen previously on Shorpy

We've seen this same location (from other occasions, when the umbrella was up & the officer on duty had no ear coverings) previously on Shorpy here and here.

[This one has a new & improved sign, with mirror and bigger letters. - Dave]

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