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Two Birds: 1920s

Two Birds: 1920s

Washington, D.C., 1920s. "Gaynor, John F., Mrs." Who looks like someone you would want to have at your party. Harris & Ewing glass negative. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Somebody

Get me a stone.

Silly old Aunt Sadie

When my second son was three, he announced that he wanted to grow up to be either a dog or a root beer stand. By the time he was five, he finally realized that a human cannot change their species and he gave up those ambitions. Great Aunt Sadie, on the other hand, always loved everything about birds and not only owned too many of them, she dressed like them and created stuffed artificial ones and often sang in her screechy soprano voice "I'm only a bird in a gilded cage" while she danced around in her feather-decorated home, hanging up fake parrots, clocks that cuckoo-ed and chirped and vases filled with peacock plumage. She refused to eat poultry or eggs and would not allow her children to whack at bird-shaped pinatas or own a cat. Their pets were mostly ducks and she would joke that you actually could keep a good duck's down as it made excellent bedding. Contrary to tterrace's belief that she would be the life of every party, for some strange reason, she was never invited to any.

A flock of chuckles

This is too hilarious! Made me think of the funny Gospel Birds story by Garrison Keillor, when a man and lady have a performance where various birds fly into church and land along the woman's arms and hands.

Papagena

Putting the best possible spin on things, I'll go with her being garbed for an opera-themed costume ball, and that there's an equally-birdbrained Papageno somewhere off in the wings. As it were.

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