MAY CONTAIN NUTS
SHORPY
HOME
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • VINTAGE CHRISTMAS ART

Bud Dry: 1924

Bud Dry: 1924

Northern California in 1924. "Willys Knight touring car on dirt road." With both Red Crown and Budweiser filling stations close by for parched cars and drivers, the Prohibition-era beer probably not as potent as the gasoline. 5x7 inch glass negative by automotive impresario Christopher Helin. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Ann Hewser?

I'd just bet that the gentlemen on the porch would read that sign as ann - hew-ser bush. My granddad did!

Inherit the Wind

Who says you can't see the wind? Here we see a gust of wind from 90 years ago, captured on film. The flag and the branches were blown by the wind during the fraction of a second that automotive impresario Christopher Helin opened the shutter to expose the plate to light. Cool pic Shorpy.

Wind Motion

What makes this photo stand out for me is the almost startling effect of the wind on the flags and many branches about. Makes it seem very much in motion.

Anheuser Busch During Prohibition

During the "Great Experiment", AB only brewed a near beer called Bivo at 0.5% alcohol by volume. I suspect that the Budweiser sign only sadly harks back to better days four years earlier when Budweiser was still available.

[The brand you're thinking of was Bevo, just one of A-B's Prohibition-era products. The company also made a low-alcohol version of its flagship Budweiser. Below, an ad from the June 20, 1924, Washington Post. - Dave]

We have a winner!

This has to be the undisputed winner in the "Most Attractive Rural General Store, 1920-1930" category. Neat, tidy, and painted.

Silent Knight

Powered by the interesting (although complex) sleeve valve engine, which Knight had "proved" to Daimler to the extent that the German car company used them extensively for years, the American cars were marketed as Silent Knights free of tappet noise associated with conventional valves.

WK comparison

The Willys Knight was a conventional car except for the sleeve valve engine. Willys bottom line car was the baby Overland (see Lands End: 1925), which had unique 1/4 elliptic springs coming to a point behind that cowcatcher, qv. Pickup quotient of damsels with a Knight is another issue.

Syndicate content  Shorpy.com is a vintage photography site featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago. Contact us | Privacy policy | Site © 2019 Shorpy Inc.