MAY CONTAIN NUTS
SHORPY
HOME
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • VINTAGE ALASKA, c. 1920s

Bureau of Standards: 1925

Bureau of Standards: 1925

February 19, 1925. "M.S. Strock measuring radio lengths at the Bureau of Standards." View full size. 4x5 glass negative, National Photo Co. Collection.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Radio Traffic Cop

A Radio Traffic Cop

Here is M.S. Strock, of the U.S. Bureau of Standards, checking broadcasting wave lengths with an apparatus of extreme accuracy. This Uncle Sam makes broadcasters keep to their own wave lengths.

Mysterious radio apparatus

Washington Post, Oct. 23. 1925.

With 600 broadcasting stations in existence, the question is sometimes asked if they are using the wave length assigned them. Morris S. Strock, of the bureau of standards, has designed an apparatus.... whereby the frequencies of distant stations may be measured.

People should STILL wear suits...

Nothing wrong with dressing properly. Sometimes I think our current standards have laxed too much. Men should dress in suits when working. Put coveralls over them to protect them in messy conditions, but otherwise, put that tie on!

Radio Wavelengths

could be purchased by the foot or yard in 1925. Thus, measurements had to be precise for accurate pricing.

Denny Gill
Chugiak, Alaska

Suited to the Task

In 1925 even a techie had to wear a suit. Indeed when I started as an IBM Customer Engineer in 1963 -- a job that involved repairing some very greasy and inky machines -- I had to wear a dark suit with a white shirt and conservative tie.

Syndicate content  Shorpy.com is a vintage photography site featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago. Contact us | Privacy policy | Site © 2019 Shorpy Inc.