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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • WWI: IF YOU CAN'T ENLIST - INVEST
 

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Fire Chief: 1942

Fire Chief: 1942

May 1942. Southington, Conn. "Thomas J. Murphy, chief of the fire department, and its only salaried member, chatting with one of the volunteers." Medium format negative by Fenno Jacobs for the Office of War Information. View full size.

 

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Closer to home than i thought

"In May 1942, during World War II, the town was selected by the War Department to be highlighted in a defense booklet called Southington, CT—Microcosm of America. Photographers roamed the community taking photos of residents at work, at play and in their homes and churches. The final publication was intended to show friends and foes alike in Europe the typical American citizens and families, their traditions and values. Thousands of copies were dropped from military airplanes over Europe during the Nazi German Occupation." (from Wikipedia)

To think that this picture could very well be dropped here in Holland 75 years ago.

Spanish windlass

Excellent use of that simple device is to be seen in the twisted wires being used to keep the legs of that chair from spreading. No doubt that leaning over to use the spittoon would put uneven loading on said legs.

Even with the cuspidor...

There is a Norman Rockwellesque ambiance to this photo.

Fire alarm boxes

The wood boxes contain cam-controlled pulse generators. They make the fire alarm bells ring a specified number of times depending on which cam is placed in the mechanism.

High-top dress shoes

Makes me think of my dad. I don't believe he ever owned a pair of low-cuts. I remember going on an unsuccessful search for them before the internet.

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