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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • VINTAGE ALASKA, c. 1920s

Fille de Grille: 1935

Fille de Grille: 1935

San Francisco, 1935. "Auto show. Model and Oldsmobile at General Motors display." 8x10 inch nitrate negative, late of the Wyland Stanley and Marilyn Blaisdell collections. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Inflation

Consider what the car would fetch in today's inflated dollars: $21,789 (according to the BLI inflation calculator). While that would be cheap for a car like an Oldsmobile, it was still the Depression and many, if not most, could ill-afford this extravagance.

[And yet Olds managed to move 126,768 cars out the door in 1935. - Dave]

Canton Queen

She's Chinese, but her features indicate she's from the south. Not surprising, as most of the Chinese that emigrated to the US and ended up in San Fran prior to 1939 were from Canton (properly Guangdong) or there about.

MSRP

NADA gives a base price of $970. I have learned that a radio cost $80, a heater $40, whitewall tires $10?, and not sure what else (freight and tax) to get up to $1207.

Sticker Shock

Wow! $1,207 and some odd cents. That's less than the down payment on most of today's automobile offerings.

35 Olds?

I'm no expert, but I think that's a '35 Olds. Why would they be showing a four year old car at the GM exhibit?

[The seller of this photo wrote "1939 GGIE" on the negative sleeve, which we bought right along with the picture. Good catch! Error corrected. - Dave]

What a Beauty!

And not just the auto. I am guessing either Philippines, or some Asian country. Tiny too. Guessing not quite 5 feet.

[And I guess this lady hails from Chinatown, San Francisco, California USA. - Dave]

Thanks Dave! - Baxado

Car Show Babes

... dressed very differently back in 1939. I'd post an example of today's babes but this is a family friendly place.

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