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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • VINTAGE ALASKA, c. 1920s

Pepco: 1935

Pepco: 1935

Washington, D.C., circa 1935. "Potomac Electric Power Co. service station building, 10th Street and Florida Avenue. Linemen's truck." 8x10 inch acetate negative by Theodor Horydczak. View full size.

 

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10th & Florida aleady developed

I considered 10th & Florida in NW too but it couldn't have been. This map from 1919 shows that 10th & Florida was an already developed urban neighborhood a decade before the PEPCO truck photo. The PEPCO building built in 1930 took the place of a large street railway car barn. To the north was a steep incline and grounds of Garfield Hospital. The PEPCO truck is out in the fringes of DC somewhere, I just don't know where.

[The photo is from this series of images showing the building at 10th and Florida NW, as well as some of the trucks garaged there. - Dave]

Incorrect address

10th and Florida was built up and developed with rowhouses by the teens and 20s. This photo must have been mislabeled. I bet they meant something like 10th and Fort NE which was a paper subdivision just starting to be built in the 1930s.

["During the 1930s, Pepco experienced a building boom ... This led to the construction in 1930 of ... a new service station at 10th and Florida Avenue, NW ..." From this document, page 12. It's now the Howard University Service Center. -tterrace]

Matchless Service

PEPCO is still the electric utility providing "matchless service" to D.C. and its Maryland suburbs. It is now owned by Exelon.

"Matchless service." Get it? It's not gas; you don't need a match to light it. That probably made more sense when electricity was competing with gas for home lighting; they haven't used the slogan for a while.

[The competition between gas and electric appliances for furnace and water heating, cooking, clothes-drying and refrigeration far outlasted the gaslight era, with the promotion of "Flameless Electric Living" and "Gold Medallion Homes" going well into the 1970s. - Dave]

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