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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • BRITISH COLUMBIA VACATION-LAND: 1950s

Gems of Gettysburg: 1875

Gems of Gettysburg: 1875

"Artistic Stereo Gems of Gettysburg Scenery -- Implements of Modern Warfare." 1875 stereograph by William Howard Tipton (1850-1929). View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Heavy Metal

In answer to the question Histry2 posed, I added the weight of each projectile to its description. The combined as manufactured weight of the ones that are identified is around 392 pounds. However, some of the display items are missing parts such as lead sabots, which would make the relic lighter. The same applies if case shot was emptied of the shot, and the shells were empty of powder, etc. Concerning the unidentified Read-Parrott styles, the six larger ones could weigh between 17 and 20 pounds each, and the seven smaller ones could be between 8 and 11 pounds each. That would add at least another 158 pounds to the display case - so about 550 pounds showing.

Weighty question

Kudos to Tobacconist for identifying so many of these esoteric projectiles. Any guess what the combined weight of these bolts, balls, and shells might have been?

That must have been one mighty sturdy cabinet, despite the fact it looks like it was designed more for dishes rather than ordnance.

By the Numbers

It is difficult to make a positive ID on some of these without being able to get close up and personal with the projectiles. At the moment numbers 19 and 48 have me flummoxed. The other unnamed ones all appear to be various calibers of Read, or Parrott, or Read-Parrott shells. I'll probably get back to those later. For better or worse, here is my attempt on the rest:

1. Tennessee Sabot/Mullane Type 1 shell with copper fuze for 3-inch ordnance rifle (Confederate) - 7 pounds 3 ounces
2. Schenkl shell for 3-inch ordnance rifle - 8 pounds
3. Solid shot for 5.82-inch caliber-inch caliber 24-pounder smoothbore - 24 pounds
4. Spherical shell for 4.62-inch caliber 12-pounder smoothbore - 9 pounds 4 ounces
5. Burton case shot for 3-inch ordnance rifle - 10 pounds 8 ounces
6. Witworth bolt (solid shot) for 2.75-inch caliber 12-pounder Whitworth rifle - 12 pounds 11 ounces
7. Dyer shell for 3-inch ordnance rifle - 10 pounds 8 ounces
8. Solid shot with wooden cup sabot for 3.67-inch caliber 6-pounder smoothbore (Confederate) - 6 pounds 5 ounces
9. Long-pattern shell for 3.67-inch caliber 20-pounder Parrott rifle - 18 pounds 1 ounce
10. Hotchkiss case shot with removable nose piece for 3.8-inch caliber 14-pounder James rifle (zinc fuze plug) - 13 pounds 2 ounces
11. Hotchkiss shell for 3-inch ordnance rifle - 8 pounds 3 ounces
12. Canister round for 2.6-inch caliber 6-pounder Wiard rifle - 5 pounds 9 ounces
13. Read bolt for 3-inch ordnance rifle - 8 pounds 1 ounces
14. Archer bolt for 3-inch rifle (Confederate) - 5 pounds 15 ounces
15. Hotchkiss shell for 3-inch ordnance rifle - 8 pounds 3 ounces
16. Conical (canister) round for 12-pounder smoothbore (missing tin cylinder and showing only 10 of the 24 iron canister balls) - 14 pounds 11 ounces
17. Solid shot for 4.62-inch caliber 12-pounder smoothbore - 12 pounds 5 ounces
18. Hotchkiss percussion shell for 3-inch ordnance rifle - 8 pounds 7 ounces
19.
20.
21.
22. Spherical shell for 4.62-inch caliber 12-pounder smoothbore - 8 pounds 7 ounces (if case-shot then 10-12 pounds)
23. Absterdam bolt for 3-inch rifle - 9 pounds 5 ounces
24.
25.
26. Spherical shell missing Bormann fuze, with wooden cup sabot for 3.67-inch caliber 6-pounder smoothbore (Confederate) - 4 pounds 15 ounces
27.
28. Read shell for 3-inch ordnance rifle - 8 pounds
29. Hotchkiss case shot for 3.8-inch caliber 14-pounder James rifle (brass fuze plug) - 14 pounds 4 ounces
30. Hotchkiss shell for 3.67-inch caliber rifled 6-pounder (lead sabot intact) - 12 pounds
31. Solid shot with wooden cup sabot for 4.62-inch caliber 12-pounder smoothbore - 12 pounds 5 ounces
32. Archer bolt (solid shot) for 3-inch rifle (Confederate) - 5 pounds 12 ounces
33. Schenkl shell for 3-inch ordnance rifle - 8 pounds
34. Read bolt for 3-inch Confederate rifle - 8 pounds 1 ounce
35.
36. Whitworth Pattern I shell for 6-pounder Whitworth rifle - 5 pounds 14 ounces
37. Pointed nose Dyer case shot for 3-inch ordnance rifle - 10 pounds
38. James Pattern II shell for 3.8-inch caliber 14-pounder James rifle (missing sabot) - 12 pounds
39.
40. Schenkl shell for 3.67-inch caliber 20-pounder Parrott rifle - 15 pounds 6 ounces
41.
42. Schenkl shell for 3.67-inch caliber 20-pounder Parrott rifle - 15 pounds 6 ounces
43.
44. Hotchkiss shell for 3.8-inch caliber 14-pounder James rifle - 14 pounds 4 ounces
45. Schenkl shell for 3.67-inch caliber rifled 6-pounder smoothbore - 10 pounds 7 ounces
46. Hotchkiss canister round for 3-inch ordnance rifle - 7 pounds 1 ounce
47.
48.
49.
50. Bormann fuzed spherical shell for 5.82-inch caliber 24-pounder smoothbore - 20 pounds 3 ounces

I wonder if the stereograph has the list on the back. I'd like to see how badly I blew it.

Number Six is a Whitworth Projectile

The hexagonal projectile number six is for a Whitworth breech-loading cannon. The bore was a hexagonal spiral rather than conventional rifling grooves.

These cannon were imported from England by the Confederacy. At least two were in action at Gettysburg.

More Info

All the projectiles have numbers. Can anyone find the list describing each one?

Mash-Ups

Sadder are the mashed-up balls -- the ones that hit something. (I have one.)

I've also seen "rosettes" -- fusions of two balls that were fired in opposite directions and collided in mid-flight, fusing themselves together as a perfectly symmetrical object that resembles a lead snowflake. Some Civil War museums have a large assortment of rosettes found on the battlefields. They're evidence of the massive volumes of volley fire that characterized Civil War battles.

Meh-dern

It must have been simply mindblowing to the previous generation of soldiers, who could not possibly have imagined that projectiles might have come in not only multiple spherical diameters, but one or two other shapes, each slightly different from the other. Just wow.

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