MAY CONTAIN NUTS
SHORPY
HOME
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • HIS MASK KEEPS HIM ON THE JOB
 

Shorpy members who are Patreon contributors now get an ad-free experience! (Mostly -- there's still an ad above the comments.) Click here for details or to sign up.

Crushing It: 1941

Crushing It: 1941

August 1941. "Farm worker in beer parlor on a Sunday afternoon. Bruce Crossing, Michigan." Acetate negative by John Vachon for the Farm Security Administration. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Open for Booziness

I made a business trip to Michigan about 15 years ago. I can attest to the fact the bars were all open on Sunday.

Yooper

That's what folks from the U.P. are called. It looks like he is dressed in his Sunday finest, including the "Big Yank" shirt. They invented the 'cigarette pocket shirt' but this does not look like one of those. Michigan must not have had Sunday "Blue Laws".
(on second look, maybe that is a 'cigarette pocket' shirt. Though maybe he prefers chewing his tobacco)

Face the sun refreshed!

Coca-Cola's "Face the Sun Refreshed" campaign slogan would soon become "The Pause That Refreshes Refreshed" by the time the United States entered World War II in December 1941.

[Coke's "Pause That Refreshes" slogan got its start in 1929, not 1941. "Face the Sun Refreshed" was not a campaign -- it's just this one advertisement. - Dave]

[I was aware Dave, that "The Pause That Refreshes" was introduced in 1929, it's therefore that I citated cited "The Pause That Refreshed" from the New Orleans National WWII Museum link, but thnx for making clear that a slogan does not make a campaign - Alex]

["The Pause That Refreshed" is the title of the Museum's web article. It is not a slogan that Coke ever used. And "Face the Sun Refreshed" is not a slogan -- it's ad copy for a single poster. The only slogan on the poster is "Delicious and Refreshing." - Dave]

Syndicate content  Shorpy.com is a vintage photography site featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago. Contact us | Privacy policy | Site © 2020 Shorpy Inc.