MAY CONTAIN NUTS
HOME
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • WE CAN DO IT! BUT FIRST, COFFEE

Miracle in Moscow: 1959

Miracle in Moscow: 1959

March 1959. "Home economist Anne Anderson demonstrating the RCA-Whirlpool 'Miracle Kitchen of the Future,' a display at the American National Exhibition in Moscow." Kodachrome by Bob Lerner for the Look magazine article "What the Russians Will See." View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Survival post-detente

The table was recently featured on an episode of “Antiques Roadshow,” having ended up with an employee of the PR firm that designed the exhibit.

Here's what the fuss is about

What's the fuss about?

I'd take the mini TV and that chair, and that's about it.

The Jetsons, indeed!

Still waiting for my flying car!

Please to consider capitalist table-top console device

Repurposed in most excellent Soviet orbital capsule.

Wireless!

As in all publicity shots, the electronic equipment is not only communicating wirelessly, it's also powered without wires! (maybe they go down the legs through the raised floor)

The kitchen computer has *finally* arrived: my wife uses her iPad for Internet recipes.

All washed up

The Russkies pushed tractors, we had microwave ovens (!!) Once they saw we'd won the home front - as it were - they must have known the Cold War was lost.

Kitchen debate

This of course became the site of the famous 'kitchen debate' between Vice President Nixon and Communist First Secretary Nikita Khrushchev ('Nik and Dick') on July 24, 1959. The transcript makes for whimsical reading today: my favorite part is when Khrushchev asks, 'Don't you have a machine that puts food into the mouth and pushes it down?' -- a notion he likely got from a Charlie Chaplin movie.

[The debate was in a kitchen at the American National Exhibition, but not this kitchen. - Dave]

Lost in Space

Where is her boy, Elroy?

Syndicate content  Shorpy.com is a vintage photography site featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago. Contact us | Privacy policy | Site © 2022 Shorpy Inc.