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Frigidaire Flair: 1960

Frigidaire Flair: 1960

November 1960. New York. "General Motors Motorama '61 at the Waldorf-Astoria. 'Ideas for Living' exhibit features model kitchen with two-oven Frigidaire Flair range with pull-out burners, mounted on a slim pedestal rising from a bed of growing plants. 'About-Face' pantry has hidden shelves that pivot out from storage wall at the touch of a button." View full size.

 

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How old do you have to be

to call every refrigerator a "frigidaire"?

Consider the average house size

Considering the size of the existing houses and their kitchens back in that era I'd think most women would appreciate these space saving appliances when finally convincing the hubby to renovate that room, or I start breaking the soap box dish collection. For apartment living it would be handy as well.

Same stove

When my mother had her kitchen revamped it included that stove. I learned to cook on it. the burner surface was retractable. While she had the old man pinned down she got a dishwasher, too. Pops was in management with GM, so the branding of the appliances was a no-brainer.

Love the Lambo doors on a GM oven!

The spiral patterns on the oven doors remind me of the interior stainless trim on the door cards of a 1960 Cadillac. Looks like some serious badge engineering going on even then.

A Bewitched Oven!

If this range looks vaguely familiar, maybe you recall seeing it on the 1960s sitcom "Bewitched." Several times it was through the oven that Samantha's Uncle Arthur would show up!

On a personal note, I found one in working order discarded on the side of the road. I was able to pass it on to a man who was rebuilding his house after Hurricane Katrina, in a '60s/'70s motif. He was thrilled!

Flaw in the concept!

Great display, but what a flawed concept! When the roast is in the oven, and the rest of the meal is on the stove, it would be difficult and dangerous to reach over the hot stove to the hot oven! And drop a heavy roasting pan into the sauce ...

The best thing about the Frigidaire stove we had when I was a kid was the oven "French doors" that opened sideways and brought the rack out to you. That was a good design!

Weenie roast

No way could having the burners below waist level and dad cooking in his skivvies be hazardous!

I'm no expert, but

I know my mother always dreamed of a stovetop which she could accidentally slide back into its storage space while the kettle, pots, and pans were still on the burners. The garden under the stove makes perfect sense -- that's where you plant spices and herbs to pluck and use while cooking. Lazy susan cabinets are cool looking, but not really practical for storing groceries. Nowadays, stationary stovetops and pull-out drawers for groceries are what model kitchens have.

And why would you need a button to spin around a lazy susan? To me, that's technical overkill. Except, I would like to be able to ask Alexa to open the drawer that has what I'm looking for in it; and to shut the drawer afterward.

[The cooking top locks in place when the burners are on. - Dave]

I guess I was complaining too much. Sorry. I live in a house built in 1961. I'm the second owner and updated the original kitchen. The original electric oven and stove were not quite as futuristic as the ones featured here; still, I replaced them with a standard gas range. I also had pull-out drawers installed in all the cabinets below the countertops. As I get older, I really appreciate having those pull-out drawers a lot more than I would appreciate lazy susans.

Solid branding

Sixty-two years later, these logos are still the same: Ajax, S.O.S, Heinz, Campbell’s, Tide, Dole, Nabisco.

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