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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • WE CAN DO IT! BUT FIRST, COFFEE

War Barn: 1941

War Barn: 1941

October 1941. "Defense motive in outdoor advertising. Near Elmira, New York." Medium format acetate negative by John Collier for the Farm Security Administration. View full size.

 

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Sparking personality

The old house I grew up in had lightning rods but no glass balls - maybe there was a reason! From the Kansas Farm Bureau:

During the 19th Century, the lightning rod became a decorative motif. Lightning rods were embellished with ornamental glass balls (now prized by collectors). The ornamental appeal of these glass balls were also used in weather vanes.

The main purpose of these balls, however, was to provide evidence of a lightning strike by shattering or falling off. If after a storm a ball is discovered missing or broken, the property owner should then check the building, rod and grounding wire for damage.

Yes! Don't waste gasoline

You may not realize it, but that car or truck you're driving isn't that fuel efficient to begin with.

But today, you should feel free to use the extra gas necessary to visit Woodlawn Cemetery in Elmira, final resting place of Mark Twain.

Wired

What are those wires leading to the masts on top of the barn? I am surmising some kind of ham radio? Communication device?

[Lightning rods. - Dave]

Thanks Dave - Baxado

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