MAY CONTAIN NUTS
HOME
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • YOU MEAN A WOMAN CAN OPEN IT?

Outside Counsel: 1936

Outside Counsel: 1936

March 1936. "View in the Negro quarter. Vicksburg, Mississippi." 8x10 inch nitrate negative by Walker Evans for the U.S. Resettlement Administration. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Sweeping the Yard.

How many noticed the broom leaning against the rail. That is for sweeping the yard. I know it is dirt. As a kid that was something I was tasked with completing when we stayed with my aunt.

A Seeming Lack of Utilities

Yes, perhaps better than the "playscape" but marginally so. I'm seeing one power pole in the background, and no power lines leading to these buildings. Do you suppose there are water, gas, or sanitary facilities? Likely not, though this is a limited view and we don't see the other end of the buildings. I'm not seeing outhouses. Others of Evans' photographs from this LOC Vicksburg group do show power lines at least passing by such housing, if not leading to them.

I've just recently discovered the metadata that Shorpy attaches to these photographs, and I am grateful for it. Thank you, Sir.

[We don't attach any metadata to these images -- it's already there. - Dave]

Can you spot the difference ...

Screen door hinges ... right side vs left side
Foundation pillars ... wood vs block
Number of steps ... four vs three
Thickness of steps ... 2x vs 1x
Window screen ... up vs down
House address ... on wall vs on post
Railing ... front overlaps side vs side overlaps front (hard to explain)
Roof pitch ... steep vs less steep (compare shadows)
Front tar paper ... 8 strips vs 7 strips
Front roof support beam ... prominent vs hidden or smaller or missing

"Negro quarters"

These little homes are at least clean and look well built.
A far cry from the recent "playscape" disaster photo!

Syndicate content  Shorpy.com is a vintage photography site featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago. Contact us | Privacy policy | Site © 2023 Shorpy Inc.