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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • UP N' ATOM: c. 1950s

Killing Machine: 1942

Killing Machine: 1942

June 1942. Army tank driver at Fort Knox, Kentucky. View full size. 4x5 Kodachrome transparency by Alfred Palmer for the Office of War Information.

 

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The Tank

Based on the shape of the driver's observation port (or whatever it's called) this is probably an M3 Medium - known to the British as the General Lee type. To our left, the driver's right is the sponson for the tank's main armament, a 75 mm hull mounted gun. Above him is a 37 mm turret mounted gun. The British disliked the height of the turret on this tank, and replaced the turret with a lower profile one to make a type they called the General Grant. The Russians, who got 1,300 via Lend-Lease, called them the "coffin for seven brothers." The Grant/Lee type were withdrawn from combat in Europe by mid-1943 but continued to operate in the China-Burma-India theater of the Pacific war until V-J Day

Tank Driver

His face is so sharp and clear, I can't stop looking at him - I think I'm in love. I wonder who he was?

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