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Truss Me: 1920

Truss Me: 1920

Washington circa 1920. "People's Drug Store, interior, 11th & G streets." In the Rubber Goods section in back you'll find the inevitable "trusses and abdominal belts." National Photo Company Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

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Princess Albert in the Big Can!

The Prince Albert my grandfather used for his pipe was a flask sized container. I always assumed that was the "Prince Albert in the can" of the famous phone prank. These cans can't be for the consumer. Perhaps tobacco was measured out by some smaller unit for the smoker's pipe pouch?

[The "cans" were tobacco tins, which came in various sizes. Smokers who rolled their own cigarettes might need a lot. Below: 14 ounces. - Dave]

Doll Display

A fine arrangement of Kewpie dolls on display at the upper left of the photo. You can almost feel the coolness of the light-colored marble soda counter.

Fascinating counter stools.

Fascinating counter stools. Fancy feet and the seats almost look like saddles.

The High-Water Hoodlum

Long missing Dashiel Hammett mystery!

Prince Albert

Prince Albert in a can, let him out! I love the chocolate bunnies in the bottom of the display case.

Gaslight

Are those plugged gas lines (pre-electric lighting) running down the center of the ceiling?

Fascinating

I don't know where to look first: The tin ceiling, the 4 blade fan (which many of us have in our own homes now), the merchandise on the shelves or the enclosed phone booth in the rear of the store. Those of us that were around in the 40s & 50s remember these places, especially the ones that were owned by the pharmacist and worked by him and his wife. The advent of People's Drug successors Rite Aid, CVS and Walgreens don't even come close to those entrepreneurs who knew us and our physicians by our first names.

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