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Stonestep: 1925

Stonestep: 1925

Washington, D.C., circa 1925. "Mrs. B.L. O'Leary house." The 2009 F Street N.W. residence of one Mrs. Bessie Lawton O'Leary, born Bessie Stanton Lawton, mother of Edwin Lawton O'Leary. The sign by the door reads "Stonestep -- Rooms, Meals." National Photo Company Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

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GWU campus

This is along what's now the southern boundary of George Washington University. There are lots of dorms around and many of the apartments are occupied by students. I recently graduated from GW and often wondered what the area was like before the school consumed it.

Quiet Zone

Special

For a dollar, that word "special" worries me.

$1 Chicken Dinner

Where to Dine

THE STONESTEP
2009 F St. N.W.
Special Chicken Dinner
Served 1:30 to 2:30, $1.


Advertisement, Washington Post, May 17, 1925

Old Screen Door

It is a nice neighborhood, with the sun shining and the trees, providing a welcome shade. You can almost hear the kids breaking the silence as they charge out of 2007 with a push on the old screen door and the spring groaning back in resistance. There also looks to be lower flats, what I knew as Polish flats growing up in Milwaukee.

[2007, like 2009, was a boardinghouse in the 1920s. It was owned for a time by a couple whose young son, a lawyer, drowned in a canoeing accident. - Dave]

How inviting!

What a peaceful, charming neighborhood. How I'd love to step off the streetcar, go up the steps and get a room (with meals by Mrs. O'Leary!). I wonder if boarders had access to that lovely balcony or the bow window below.

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