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Federal Taxi: 1914

Federal Taxi: 1914

Washington, D.C., 1914. "Federal taxicab garage, 13th Street." These cabs served Union Station. Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Cleanup

The man kneeling appears to be cleaning as spill. We still use the stuff he is spreading today (or kitty litter if none is available).

[As noted below, he's putting on tire chains. Driver of 5412 is pulling on an air hose. - Dave]

5412 revisited

That spotlight is quite impressive; I wonder if the driver could aim it if so required. Neat that two headlights seem to not be totally in vogue yet.

Main 8000 where are you

It's a pity taxi drivers no longer wear uniforms and pride themselves on clean cabs. Boston, especially.

Down on the floor

Does anyone have any ideas about what the half-kneeling man on the left is doing?

[Putting on chains. - Dave]

1914 Renault

The Franklin looking car is a Renault. They started using that style hood in 1902 and moved the radiator from the hood sides to the firewall in 1904. The style remained substantially unchanged for the next 24 years including the WWI years. 1914 was the last year of passenger vehicle production until after the war, since the production lines were mainly taken up with the manufacture of tanks. Starting again with the same look in 1919, Renault stuck with it until 1928/29 when they made the hood more streamlined. They moved the radiator to the front in 1930.

5412: A Renault

The radiator configuration is a lot like a pre-war Renault taxi. Mack trucks also used the same layout.

Call MAIN 8000

1913_federal_taxi

5412

An air-cooled Franklin?

[There seems to be a radiator behind the engine. - Dave]

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