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Crossings: 1939

Crossings: 1939

Savannah, Georgia, circa 1939. "Georgia Central Railway Bridge, Railroad Street." 8x10 inch acetate negative by Frances Benjamin Johnston. View full size.

 

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The bridges today

The bridge seen in the distance is now in use for pedestrians by the Savannah College of Art and Design. To access the dining hall students walk over the bridge to a neighboring residence hall. The bridge seen directly in front of the photograph is not currently in use, but plans have been thrown around for many years for the Roundhouse Museum to the east of the bridge to eventually recreate a short line of track for educational use.

These bridges took trains directly into rail yards that have been converted to other uses over time, look to the east of the bridges and several long narrow buildings still stand. Some were cargo and others were passenger. One is the Savannah Visitors Center and the other is the Architecture Department for the Savannah College of Art and Design. A third was dismantled several years ago after many years of neglect.

Deja view

Thought that bridge looked familiar.

Here it is!

I think this photo would have been taken from the exact spot.

Spendid!

The composition of this shot is simply splendid! As is the feisty-looking Frances.

Louisville Road & West Boundary

The bridge in the foreground is still standing but disconnected. You can get a good look at the bridge in the background from West Boundary Street via Street View.


View Larger Map

Another winner!

Thanks to Ben & Dave. I wonder what he was set up on to compose this view?

[Fun fact: "Ben" was a she. - Dave]

Time is relative

Great picture; impossible to gauge when it was taken, 1939 or 1859, the view would probably be the same.

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