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15th and G: 1919

15th and G: 1919

Washington, D.C., circa 1917. "Street scene, 15th and G Streets near Riggs National Bank." Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

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Below is the same view from May of 2015.

Streetcar switch tower

The "signalman's shack" was for the streetcars. It was actually a switch tower from which an employee would control the track switches directing the trolleys along their proper routes. Six of these were originally installed around Union Station when it opened in 1907. Several were then relocated to control particularly complex trackage, such as in the area in the photograph. One is preserved at the National Capital Trolley Museum. Small and cramped; it must have been delightful duty during a 95 degree Washington summer day!

Right on the Money

This is a great picture. And not a horse in sight, too.

Back in the 1980s, the American Security Bank slogan was "Right on the Money," referring to its position on the $10 bill.

Mixed Signals

In the background right in the center of the photo is what looks like a small signalman's shack on a pole - would this have been for automobile traffic, or for the streetcars? In either case, I don't see any signals! Perhaps for operating a track switch?

Riggs Bank

More of the Riggs Bank facade. Now a PNC bank.

Cold, Blustery Day!

I can almost feel it in my bones just sitting here.

Apropos

Getting ready to head to work at 15th & H, what a way to start my morning!

Who are these people?

They look so good, so fit and trim and well-dressed. I wonder what country is that? I'd love to live there.

Today

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