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Atlantic City: 1907
1907. "Atlantic City boardwalk and attractions." Including Young's Million-Dollar Pier and the ... credit they kept the smaller Dennis hotel. Or maybe Atlantic City had something to say about that? What an Outrage In ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 04/08/2024 - 12:49pm -

1907. "Atlantic City boardwalk and attractions." Including Young's Million-Dollar Pier and the Hotel Marlborough-Blenheim (Marlborough House at center and the domed Blenheim to the left). Panorama made from two 8x10 glass negatives. Detroit Publishing Co. View full size.
Brighton ParkI'm  happy to see the little park next to the hotel is still there, even though the lovely old hotel has been replaced by an ugly monstrosity, Bally's Park. 
I have wonder what the architects of said monstrosity would say to me. Maybe they would remind me that Bally's allows many more people to have an ocean view and that wood, stone and stucco are not viable choices for skyscrapers. To Bally's credit they kept the smaller Dennis hotel.  Or maybe Atlantic City had something to say about that? 
What an OutrageIn Florida the developers would never allow a vacant piece of land like the park to stay. There must be a condo or hotel there.  We have to put the New Yorkers somewhere!
Charm CityLooking at the 1907 photo in full size, it aches with charm. The architecture, the lawns, and crowds are almost idyllic. 1907 was, indeed, a time of prosperity and tranquility in the United States. It would be another 10 years before we entered WWI while the Spanish Flu killed 675,000 Americans.  
Regardless of wars and disease, the Atlantic City of 1907 was doomed. Here is what this section of the boardwalk looks like today. The pin drop is on Brighton Park. You have beach on one side, and almost nonstop kitschy retail on the other.
Click to embiggen.

(Panoramas, Atlantic City, DPC, Swimming)

Atlantic Avenue: 1905
Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1905. "Atlantic Avenue." Meet you in front of Two Stumps in an hour. Detroit ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 08/20/2012 - 9:52am -

Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1905. "Atlantic Avenue." Meet you in front of Two Stumps in an hour. Detroit Publishing Co. glass negative. View full size.
Detroit Publishing Co.I was wondering, was the DPC cmomissioned to take photos all over the USA, or did they do this on their own. Interesting picture of Atlantic Avenue.
[Detroit Publishing's main business was selling color postcards printed using autochrom process. These glass negatives were the starting point. And right here on Shorpy, 100 years later, is where they are being seen for the first time in all their hyper-detailed glory. - Dave]
Two Stumps?Then you really don't need shoes at all.
After 105 years, not much is leftThis appears to be the corner of Pennsylvania and Atlantic Avenues. The old Courthouse can be seen on the left, and is now gone, as is almost everything else. The only structure extant is the six-story building with the clock-cupola on the right. The clock and cupola are gone, but the distinctive front entrance is intact.
View Larger Map
What is this, the Old West?Come on New Jersey, it's the 20th Century.  Put down some asphalt, cobblestones, anything!
[The paving here seems to be brick, with an overlay of crud and mud. - Dave]
Coffin nails...I note that Smoker's Paradise is right across the street from the undertaker's.
Amazing detailThe building on the right has a lot of interesting details on it, like the rounded windows (they must have been expensive to replace), the fleur-de-lis below the windows, and the old men (Neptune?) along the roof line.
I also liked the Common Sense Shoe Store, which must have been for people without stumps.
Help WantedThey talk about the "good old days" being a misconception. Still, when the Employment Bureau has a "help wanted" sign out front, makes you think certain things like the job market were certainly better in 1905.
Used to own two houses on Atlantic Avenue.But ended up losing them to some rich guy with a hotel on Boardwalk.  
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC, Streetcars)

Atlantic City Forever: 1912
"I could stay in Atlantic City forever." A Kodak moment circa 1912 at the New Jersey resort. 5x7 glass negative, Detroit Publishing Co. View full size. Atlantic City I work in Atlantic City - It's a shame they tore down the ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 04/25/2011 - 11:08am -

"I could stay in Atlantic City forever." A Kodak moment circa 1912 at the New Jersey resort. 5x7 glass negative, Detroit Publishing Co. View full size.
Atlantic CityI work in Atlantic City - It's a shame they tore down the lovely Victorian buildings. I bet those folks are sitting in front of the Marlborough-Blenhiem, the most ornate of the old hotels.  
Da Yellow KidIsn't that Da Yellow Kid to the left of the photographer, face partially obscured by the drape/hood/cape (whatever it is called) of the camera?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Yellow_Kid
No Time Like the PastIn the late 60's until the  mid 70's I worked with a photographer who specialized primarily in postcards. He would photograph the clouds if it took all night for them to move into the position he wanted. He would use a view camera only like the one above. That was the best I have ever seen. No matter what is said there are no times like old times.
RagtimeThis shot made me flash on a scene from the movie Ragtime. The family in the movie takes a trip to a very similar looking beach resort, and I think the date of the photo is very close to the era portrayed in the movie. Can't remember if the movie ever specifies a location.
I See Coneheads ... Oh. That's someone's coat draped over a railing. Doy.
Never mind!
Whoa.Nice girl on that ass. Had to say it.
Love The Photo!My husband and I were born and brought up in Ventnor, right next to Atlantic City on Absecon Island and we went "uptown" often.  This is a wonderful piece of nostalgia, although by our day, bikinis had taken the place of the ladies' modest attire.  Great picture!
The AssThe ass looks none too thrilled to be there but a job's a job I guess.
Conehead!Could we get a close up of the blond headed fellow in the center of the picture with apparently the Mohawk or Conehead hair. Was this in style during this time period, or is this an artifact in the picture of some kind?
[How long have you been seeing Coneheads? - Dave]

Sweet ShadesIt's funny, I don't think of the early 1900s as being a time of sunglasses, but the woman with the hat and skirt is clearly sporting some cool shades. Who knew?
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC, Sports)

Grand Atlantic: 1905
Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1905. "Grand Atlantic Hotel -- Open All Year." Someone grab a ladder and oil that creaky ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 08/13/2012 - 6:58pm -

Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1905. "Grand Atlantic Hotel -- Open All Year." Someone grab a ladder and oil that creaky shutter. View full size.
Back in the day, when weBack in the day, when we weren't so paranoid about letting the outside air drift through our homes. 
First bed and breakfast?Would like to stay in the annex next to the main hotel.
Men with hatsIt would appear that Derbies were in this season. 
I WonderDid these gorgeous buildings face the ocean?
Forget the HotelI want a room in the annex.
No unsightly trolley wires hereOthers have pointed out at this photo:
https://www.shorpy.com/node/12774?size=_original
that the Grand Atlantic is on Virginia Ave., which is at a right angle to the ocean, so the front of the Hotel doesn't face the sea.
There is modern electric streetcar service to this termite's delight, but it's not a trolley.  The far track is equipped with the Pullen System of surface electrical contact boxes.  The near track hasn't been converted from horse car or steam dummy service.
Extract from a Jersey Shore Diary April 25th 1905
I just spent a most enjoyable day and didn't have to travel a bit which was enjoyable since I had spent a few hours on trains and ferries from Philadelphia and arrived late.
I was able to get my usual room (2nd floor front) at the annex where the service is as good as the main building but seems less formal and not as crowded.
I slept in late and took a perch on the main porch and was delighted by the gentle breezes and the parade of handsome and genteel ladies who passed by. There were even a few winks and flashing smiles thrown my way.
I ambled over to the barbershop for a trim and a little baseball talk. The Athletics look good this year and since Rube Waddell was pitching today I asked Tony to place a $5.00 wager on the A's.
The sea air had given me quite the appetite so a visit to the Grand Atlantic Hotel Bar & Buffet seemed to be the logical next step.
There was all manner of seafood and stout lagers to be found there. After a hearty meal at the bar I lit a cigar and noticed one of the ladies who had given me a grand smile passed by and entered the ladies section with another couple.
Feeling a little bold I introduced myself and discovered Ethel of The Grand Smile was vacationing with her brother and sister-in-law.
After an hour or so of conversation about mundane, practical and profound things we made a date to meet the next morning for a Beach & Boardwalk stroll. Hopefully I'll be able to convince Ethel to ride with me in one of those two-seat man propelled carriages on the Boardwalk. I blush to think where the conversation we have as we travel the Boardwalk might lead?  
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC)

Islesworth Gardens: 1906
Continuing our trip to Atlantic City circa 1906. "Islesworth Gardens Hotel, Virginia Avenue." 8x10 glass ... there now. All Gone I'm about an hour's drive from Atlantic City, though not being a gambler, I don't go there often. With the ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 08/14/2012 - 12:32pm -

Continuing our trip to Atlantic City circa 1906. "Islesworth Gardens Hotel, Virginia Avenue." 8x10 glass negative, Detroit Publishing Co. View full size.
Just for a momentI thought the woman in the streetcar was texting a friend.  Then I woke up!
Great shot!I think the Trump Taj Mahal casino is there now. 
All GoneI'm about an hour's drive from Atlantic City, though not being a gambler, I don't go there often. With the advent of the casinos, locales such as this, evidently at the Boardwalk, are completely gone. I'll have to make a trip there with a camera and some of these old pictures to see the differences. Thanks for all the great pictures.
The Streetcar!At first I was confused with the streetcar having its pole up in the wrong direction for a double track line but then I noticed that there is a crossover (a pair of switches in the street) allowing the car to "turn back" or "short turn" without having to go to the end of the route.  The pole has been turned but the seats are still facing the wrong direction.  The faded lettering on the sign on the roof also suggests that this car might not be going to the end of the line.
InterestingThe only people I see around here using parasols are Asians.
Remembering Atlantic City in the 1950sOur family vacationed in Atlantic City for many summers in the 1950s.  We would load up our old Buick, include the dog, and take off from Cincinnati for that glorious week on the Jersey Shore.  We stayed in an old converted mansion on North Carolina Avenue called the Manlor Guest House. Every morning was an open air breakfast on the Boardwalk, then to the beach and back to the Manlor to squirt off the sand in the backyard and go to dinner at Betty's Restaurant.
The Manlor is long gone along with all the other old converted homes but those places had a charm that no Holiday Inn could replace.
Look through the windowYoung lady in the window under the letter "N" of the streetcar looks like she just realized she has purchased the wrong ticket. 
TrumpedIf this is where the Trump Taj is now, I think it looked much better then!
Her TownThe sidewalks are full of Mary Poppinses.
The End of the Line or Back at 'Go'?The streetcar in the photo is interesting, having just arrived at this location on the track closest to the curb and the horse cabs.
The car seatbacks are in position indicating the right end of the car was the front on arrival, the seat backs could be flipped over depending on car's direction.
The outer arm rests are on the window ledges.
The seats at the front and rear two side windows would have their backs to the window, the patrons facing the aisle.
On cars with sanders the sand boxes would often be located under these lengthways seats which hinged up when filling with sand.
However, the trolley pole has been moved around so the car will now travel right to left when it starts on it's next journey, the left end now the front.
The car is short enough, altho' it has two 4-wheel trucks beneath, that the Motorman or Conductor could walk the trolley pole around with the trolley pole rope still able to hang over the end at either end with the trolley pole stand centered lengthways on the car roof.
Without the trolley pole rope overhanging it would be difficult to centre the trolley pulley on the wire.
A longer two-truck car would have to have a separate trolley pole at each end.
There were also parameters governing the placement of the trolley pole stand on the car roof so that the pulley would track on the wire properly when the car beneath turned at a track switch at an intersection or went straight thru.
Now, there are TWO tracks in the street, and this car will cross over to the far track to 'Run on the right' as it moves ahead on it's new journey.
The 'crossover' in the street is visible by the man's head above the nearest horse cab and thru the cab behind.
Thank You.
Phones in RoomsThe Islesworth Gardens Hotel was popular with conventioneers (pharmacists, railroad ticket agents, elevator operators ...)

1908 Advertisement 


Impossible waistsThe women wearing corsets have those impossibly small wasp waists.  I wonder about the young woman walking toward the camera. She appears to have a normal waist.  The corset must have exacerbated the heat problem.  Give me my smelling salts. And Gracious Sakes, I see a few women without their hats in public!
City of the FutureIt looks like a futuristic city of dollhouses. They had some kind of super "green" vehicle that ran on hay and produced fertilizer instead of carbon monoxide... and even mass transit that ran on electricity! Wow, imagine if we could harness that kind of technology.
No sunscreen requiredI but none of these people is thinking about sunscreen!  Also, its a shame that we don't use parasols anymore.  I count about 15 in this picture (if you count both sides of the street).
Dress CodeNo shorts or tank-tops allowed!
Good MannersNotice that the men use proper etiquette when walking with a female companion. The man walks on the street side, ladies to the inside.  By the way, what is the covering on the roofs of the horse cabs? Is it some kind of treated cloth?
In praise of ShorpyShorpy is my all time favorite web site ! It's like having a portal to the past. Shorpy lets us see in incredible detail what life was like decades ago. I tell everyone I know about this fantastic site.  My problem with this site is that I could spend all day looking at the photos. Thank you for all of the work you do in making these Library of Congress photos look as good as they do.
Fastest Way to Ocean CityThat interurban trolley on the right is from the Shore Fast Line connecting Atlantic City to Ocean City, New Jersey.  It operated into the 1940s and was immortalized as the Short Line on the Monopoly game board. 
Car 6812West Jersey and Seashore Type Q semi-convertible, built by the J. G. Brill Co., Phila, 1904-05.  Originally single ended, rebuilt as double ended car in 1908. Sold off in 1913-14 when new "Nearside" cars were delivered.
The cars, incidentally, are numbered in the Pennsylvania Railroad fleet as the WJ&S was a PRR subsidiary.
This is the kind of picturethat deserves the "even bigger" option, or the colorized version. Lovely, absolutely lovely in every detail. Exquisite photo.
Speaking of Monopoly RR'sDid we ever find out why Darrow used the B&O railroad for his game? The Baltimore and Ohio never served Atlantic City; only the Shore Fast, Reading, Pennsylvania (later these would merge into the PRSL) and the Central RR of NJ (with it's its infamous Blue Comet) did.
From Atlantic City to Ocean CityThe trolley advertises 2 ways to get to Ocean City:
"SHORE FAST LINE ELECTRIC FLYERS
VIA GREAT EGG HARBOR BAY"
"ATLANTIC AVE. TROLLEY
AND BOAT VIA LONGPORT"
No. 6818 is a local Atlantic City car, maybe even a shuttle out to Atlantic Avenue.  It does not have 3rd rail shoes, which Shore Fast Line cars needed, as they used a part of the West Jersey & Seashore RR to get across the meadows between West Atlantic City and Pleasantville, where the electrified railroad didn't use overhead wire.
Shore Fast Line ran between Virginia Avenue and the Boardwalk, Atlantic City to 8th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City, both on barrier islands, via the Mainland.
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC, Streetcars, Travel & Vacation)

Greetings From Atlantic City: 1904
Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1904. "Boardwalk from the beach." 8x10 inch dry plate ... They were Philadelphia residents and an excursion to Atlantic City by ferry and train was a typical summertime activity. Imagine ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 08/13/2012 - 8:43pm -

Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1904. "Boardwalk from the beach." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.
Phillips for Your Photo in ACMy paternal gradmother, Emma, and her kids had their postcard format photo taken at the Phillips studio, 1619 Boardwalk, about a dozen years after the "Greetings" photo.  My father, Bill, is in front with the shovel, while older brother and sister Sam and Hazel are behind.  They were Philadelphia residents and an excursion to Atlantic City by ferry and train was a typical summertime activity.
Imagine my surprise when I saw the Phillips photo studio included in the Shorpy scene.
There he is!I found Waldo.  He's right behind the dude from Village People adjusting his wedgie.
That lifeguardHe looks very familiar.
Japanese goodsA google search shows an Emanary business in NY specialized in Japanese goods. We can indeed (barely) read "Japanese" on that S.Emanery shop window.
http://www.14to42.net/16street2.html
Hey you with the camera
I think this less-than Shorpy photo is a continuation of the one posted; the "ry & co." to the left seems to be a part of the S. Emanary sign.
Anyways, that ACB Patrol gentleman looks awfully wary of the camera.
The LifeguardAlthough they look fairly similar, I don;t believe they are the same. The Handsome Rake (on Brighton Beach) from the other photo looks a few years younger and this photo was taken the year before the other photo.
https://www.shorpy.com/node/6901?size=_original
Scandalous!The young man in the middle-ground right side is about to touch the big-toe of the woman next to him with the tip of his index finger. He was probably forced to marry her after that.
3 Men...where's the baby?Is that Tom Selleck's Grandfather scratching his leg?  
Under the boardwalkI'm always surprised to see that people used to use the place under the boardwalk for shade.  Any time I'm down at the shore, especially Atlantic City, I try to avoid going under the boardwalk, imagining that there's unpleasantness of various sorts under there.  And too, the beach there at Atlantic City is so deep, you'd never touch the sea if you stayed under the boardwalk.  
The girl in the sailor swim suit is so pretty. What cheekbones!  
100 year old wedgieIs that the lifeguard from a previous post adjusting his trousers? 
Form factorNot an overweight person in the crowd. My how times have changed.
Under itWell, now I understand the song, "Under the Boardwalk." Those chairs would appear to be comfortable perches from which to watch the peopled world go by. The white canopies above the chairs are apparently to catch sand and trash that fall through the cracks.
Sandy bottomsI wonder when some unsung genius thought up the idea of sitting on a towel while at the beach.  All of these old seashore images show everyone's bathing costume caked with scratchy sand, but they look as if they are happy as pigs in the mud.
"Types"So many in this century-old scene! Jocks, the Pretty Girl, the Clueless Dork, the Twins, Dude Checkin' Out the Ladies. Plus of course lots of Old People.
Re: Form FactorI now amuse myself when pictures of crowds and kids' classes come up by counting the comments before someone declares, "And nobody in the picture is fat!" Getting to be quite a theme!
Re: TypesClueless dork? Can't think which one you mean! That's too funny. 
Bathing Suit lawsThis was back in the day when male chests had to be covered in public by local ordinances and laws. 
[In addition to swimsuits! - Dave]
And I thought it was only in the cartoonsLook at the two little tots standing on the boardwalk upper left.  I had no clue children really dressed like this.  I remember watching Bugs Bunny cartoons with kids dressed like this holding a lollipop but I never really thought it was the norm.
I itch just looking at this photoIt apparently predates the invention of the giant-size beach towel.  Just imagining the combination of damp sand and salty-wet woolen swimwear makes me squirm in my seat.
(And is it just me, or is something odd going on in the front of Mr. A.C.B.'s trunks?)
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC, Swimming)

Pier Review: 1907
1907. "Atlantic City Boardwalk (lower right) and Young's Million-Dollar Pier." Out on the pier ... happy, laughing passengers," according to an item in the Atlantic Review ). This image, a continuation of yesterday's Atlantic City ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 04/10/2024 - 1:58am -

1907. "Atlantic City Boardwalk (lower right) and Young's Million-Dollar Pier." Out on the pier just beyond Marine Hall, and modeled after a popular Coney Island ride, is an attraction called The Tickler ("The big tubs go bowling their curious way down the incline, loaded with happy, laughing passengers," according to an item in the Atlantic Review). This image, a continuation of yesterday's Atlantic City panorama, shows at least two box kites on what must have been a windy day. 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.
Sense of loneliness ...A few scattered figures at the water's edge are only the reminder that our beloved "actors" of this photo have left the stage.
TickledIs this the same Tickler as seen in Cincinnati a couple years later?
https://www.shorpy.com/node/8631
Westerly BreezeJudging by the angle of the blown skirts, it was a westerly breeze, blowing in from Pennsylvania, across the Jersey Shore, and out to sea.
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC, Swimming)

Atlantic City Boardwalk: 1908
Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1908. "Chalfonte Hotel and the Boardwalk." With some ... wool clothes. Double Chairs From a WPA guide to Atlantic City: The next milestone in the history of the resort was the ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 08/24/2011 - 1:14pm -

Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1908. "Chalfonte Hotel and the Boardwalk." With some sort of  spillage splotch in the middle, "double chair" rental on the right and a 45-star flag topping it all off. Detroit Publishing glass negative. View full size.
Chair rental50 cents for the double chair rental seems like a lot in 1908. Unless that included one of the many men standing around to push you? Kind of like a rickshaw.
[Chair rental circa 1908 was 50 cents an hour. In 1913 the A.C. city commission, in a move to cut "chair congestion," passed an ordinance raising mercantile taxes on the chairs by $5 a year -- to $10 on single chairs, and $20 for double chairs. The commission's goal was a doubling of the rental rate to a dollar an hour. - Dave]
Sandy ClothesWow. I can't imagine how long it must have taken to get the sand out of those heavy wool clothes.
Double ChairsFrom a WPA guide to Atlantic City:
The next milestone in the history of the resort was the invention of the rolling chair in 1884. M.D. Shill, a Philadelphia manufacturer of invalid chairs, go-carts and perambulators, came to Atlantic City and opened a store to rent out baby carriages to summer families. He also rented out invalid chairs for convalescents and cripples. Within a few years these invalid chairs evolved into the double chair with a pusher. Triple chairs followed, completing the fleet of comfortable sightseeing chairs of today.
Tim-bers!Wow, those are some beautiful timbers stacked on the beach.  Timbers like those would cost a fortune today.
TransitionsAtlantic City transitioned from this sedate scene to a bustling family-oriented seaside resort by the 1940s. I remember the Steel Pier and the Diving Horse. By the early '70s,  A.C. hit rock bottom...then gambling was legalized. The rest (along with visitors' money) is history. 
Tanning and HorsesLooking at all the clothes these people are wearing makes me realize that being tan probably wasn't as common, at least for city folk. There is hardly any skin showing on anyone. 
Also, note the horses bottom left. I guess someone had the job of cleaning up after them on the beach/boardwalk. 
Neat picture, btw. And I agree about the time machine, though I'd like a ticket back in case things didn't work out. 
Wow...Can I go back in time please... One way is OK... Sign me up and get me outta here!
45 StarsIf the flag has 45 stars and the date is 1908, the hotel owner should have bought a new flag. Utah was the 45th state, admitted in 1896. Oklahoma was 46th, admitted in 1907.
[The 46-star flag was adopted July 4, 1908. If the photo was taken in 1908, it was probably before the Fourth of July. - Dave]
Ah yes, the old ChalfonteIn the early 1940's, while the tires were still mileage-viable on my dad's 1937 Chevy 2-door, we traveled to AC from Newburgh, NY, several times as a family. We usually bunked at the Chalfonte or its sister hotel down the block, Haddon Hall. As a kid my favorite place on the AC boardwalk was the James Salt Water Taffy shop. They sold pressed paper cartons of those filling-yankers in really neat-looking wire barrel shapes. For many years, I used one of these as a piggy bank.
Hotel lobbiesCirca 1926 Ethel Waters made a record called "Jersey Walk," about a girl who dances in the hotel lobbies "just to hear those bellhops yell... 'Shake 'em up kid, shake 'em up kid, shake 'em up lady...'"
Janet Klein and her Parlor Boys recorded it much more recently.
Postal PhotosI see that Palace Postal Photos are best.  I assume that is a place you could go to get a souvenier photo made to mail to the folks back home.  Got any of those in your bag Dave?
[Afraid not. - Dave]
The Chalfonte and The Haddon Hall down the blockThose were family favorites for mini-vacations from upstate New York, so long as the tires on my dad's '37 Chevvy two-door had viable treads. Best shop on the AC Boardwalk for me was the James' Salt Water Taffy shop a few blocks west of the Chalfonte. They packaged their product in a molded papier-mache carton in the shape and color of a white barrel. I used one of these for years as a kid for my spare pocket change.
Nap time!I like the man on the beach taking a siesta. What strikes me most about this picture is how lazy we've become in regard to architecture. Maybe a glass brick is easier to heat and cool as well as construct but dang, look at that beautiful building!
Shill Rolling ChairI recently purchased a Shill Rolling Chair that seats three people. The brass plate mounted on the front of the white wicker frame says the charge was 75 cents an hour for one person or $1 an hour for two or more. I am curious about the age of the rolling chair. Based on the price per hour, would you know the age of my chair?
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC, Sports)

Atlantic City: 1900
Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1900. "Boardwalk, Easter morning." 8x10 dry plate glass ... count... Rolling chairs Rolling chairs have been an Atlantic City boardwalk tradition for many decades. They're still popular ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 08/13/2013 - 3:46pm -

Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1900. "Boardwalk, Easter morning." 8x10 dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.
The Common PeopleI realize it is Easter, but everyone is dressed so well that they all look like someone important.  I wonder how different their attire would be on a regular day.
WirelessAmazing how many more power lines there are in 6 years. Check out "Under the Boardwalk: 1906".
Makes me sweatIt's lovely to look at the wonderful dresses and hats of old, but it makes me sweat!  I know they look beautiful and I love looking at them but not so practical!!!
One legged man?The man walking toward us on the lower far left, close-by the boardwalk fence, and just past the streetlight -- is the fact that he appears to have only one leg some kind an illusion? He doesn't have a cane, nor any help from the people he is with. How deyupd he otherwise move along?
[I think he probably has the usual number of legs. ("Deyupd"?) - Dave]
Upper Class ConveyanceI am curious about the adult baby buggies.  Does anyone know who used these?  Some of the passengers look like they could be dowagers, but it's hard to tell.  Maybe it was just lazy people.
Clackety clackI guess it was fashionable in this era to take the wife out for a push.
ChildlessWhere are the kids?  I can only see one.  A scene like this today would be dominated by families with children. 
Put on your Easter bonnetThe importance of hatboxes, hairpins, hat racks and so on now helps me understand. There isn't one hatless person around that boardwalk.
Re: ChildlessWell, I see at least 8 kids on the foreground, before the masses in the back make it too difficult to count...
Rolling chairsRolling chairs have been an Atlantic City boardwalk tradition for many decades.  They're still popular today.
Look at the Slim WaistlinesThe ladies cut some beautiful silhouettes. 
Must be too coldI don't see any guys in speedos on the beach.
There appears to bea lot of bustle-tugging by the ladies.
The real skinnyCorsets, darling Anonymous Tipster. Corsets which bind, restrict and generally squeeze everything in a manner in which they were not meant to be squeezed are the cause of the "slim" waistlines. 
Who needs to take a full breath if their waist looks slim?
On the Boardwalk, out by the seaWhen I was a very little girl (I am guessing spring of 1960) they still had the wicker rolling chairs on the Boardwalk in  Atlantic City. By that time they were not pushed, but pedaled by a driver.
In some cases the driver was at the front of the chair, on others at the rear behind the passengers. Very few were motorized back then. Some were no longer wicker.
The second time I was in Atlantic City (late 1960's) there were no wicker pedicabs with bicycles left. They were all motorized, made of steel, but still of the rickshaw concept.
They were part taxi (since you pay to ride them and they have a driver) and part amusement ride. At the time this photo was taken (until a 1944 hurricane destroyed it) the Boardwalk was seven miles long. That is why they had cabs. By the time I was there it was still over four miles long, as it remains today.
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, Bicycles, DPC, Easter)

Atlantic City City Hall: 1907
Circa 1907. "City Hall -- Atlantic City, N.J." With streetcars of the West Jersey & ... Anybody know where the bell(s) went? (The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC, Streetcars) ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 03/19/2021 - 11:09am -

Circa 1907. "City Hall -- Atlantic City, N.J." With streetcars of the West Jersey & Seashore Railroad. 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.
The Earl and the GirlFrom Wikipedia:   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Earl_and_the_Girl
Fire Dept.That fire trumpet wind vane is extra cool. 
Not quite Big Ben, but ...I'd bet there was a bell (maybe more than one) in that tower just below the clock.  Those baffles not only serve to keep out the worst of the weather, but deflect sound down toward the street.  Building demolished in 1969.  Anybody know where the bell(s) went? 
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC, Streetcars)

Keep Smiling: 1906
... Jersey shore circa 1906. "Rolling chair on the Boardwalk, Atlantic City." In the distance, the giant safety razor seen on the Gillette sign in the ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 08/14/2012 - 11:39am -

The Jersey shore circa 1906. "Rolling chair on the Boardwalk, Atlantic City." In the distance, the giant safety razor seen on the Gillette sign in the previous post. 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.
Keep SmilingWhaddaya mean, keep smiling ? I AM smiling. 
The Wicked Witch of the East?The smiling, striding woman on the left is a dead ringer for Margaret Hamilton.
Ouch!I was admiring the smiling lady, which seems uncommon in this period, and when I panned over to the stern couple in the rolling chair with the sign I laughed myself out of my chair.  Thanks Dave, this is the most delightful photo I've seen.
A Short Time LaterI hope the poor bugger in the rolling chair hopped out and ran away with the smiling lady and left that evil eyed old biddy behind.
Hotel TraymoreAs noted in Dave's comment, vantage point for the previous birds-eye view of the beach.
Is it a smileor a maniacal grin?  The lady on the left seems to be holding her cane in a very threatening way.  Perhaps it's her husband in the rolling chair running off with her mother!
Rolling chairsAh, that's what you call them. I was thinking maybe "nobility scooter."
Hello Pork Pie HatLove the gent's hat.  A cool modern topper, especially compared to the fusty lady sitting next to him.
Rolling Chair Evils

Washington Post, Apr 22, 1900 


Reforms in Atlantic City
Rolling-Chair Evil Regulated

This resort wears the aspect of summer, with a crowded boardwalk, and ideal sky, warm breeze, and everything in the way of amusement and entertainment in full swing.  So great is the multitude of people that certain features of the city which have given it its attractiveness promise to become, and to certain extent now are, veritable nuisances. Once of these is the rolling chair, which every invalid who has ever been here and many of the perfectly able visitors know and have enjoyed.  There are other visitors, those of the pedestrian class, who find their strolls on the Boardwalk at times almost blocked by the chairs, which line up five and six across the walk.  There are no less than 600 of them.
But a new grievance against the chairs has come up.  Careless attendants have recently been employed, and because of the rolling of the chairs against a number of visitors, several handsome Easter promenade gowns have been torn, and others ruined by the dust and grease from the unprotected wheels.  The authorities have now stepped in with vigor, and all the chair attendants are to be uniformed, provided with badges, and are to held accountable to the police department.  This move will be hailed with general satisfaction.
The morals of the Boardwalk have also been tuned up by the authorities.  It took the police an entire week to learn that one or two mutascope showmen were exhibiting for "a nickel a look," scores of pictures decidedly "Frenchy." Then one morning Mayor Frank Stoy and a Baptist clergyman took a stroll and examined the pictures. Before night official orders were issued, and before morning the mutascope men had changed the pictures in toto, and now complain that business has fallen off.  But the police order stands.


Washington Post, Feb 12, 1939 


Atlantic City Rolling Chairs Prove Popular

The Boardwalk rolling chair, almost exclusively an Atlantic City vehicle, which was first introduced in 1887, is still a popular feature in the resort.
The late George Hayday at first rented the chairs to invalids, who found the Boardwalk chair rides stimulating but later learned that persons in the best of health also enjoyed the chairs.  The chairs, which are constructed here, were later enlarged to accommodate two or three persons.  There are now 1,500 in use.
Everyone who has ever visited Atlantic City will remember them and many a romance has started under the moon in a Boardwalk rolling chair.  Should the weather prove to be a trifle cool, a warm robe and glass windshield protect the ride.

Amazing photoIt's almost surreal the way the characters pop out of this photo.  The clarity of those early lenses makes one wonder why modern cameras can't match the dots per inch. Amazing!
[It's not so much the clarity of the lens as the size of the "image sensor." In this case, a humongous 8 by 10 inches. - Dave]
Sun GrinsThe "smiling lady" doesn't seem to be smiling to me. She has the same expression I do when I go outside and forget my sunglasses. I have VERY light sensitive eyes and end up with the "sun grins" without my sunglasses, even in cloudy weather. I can easily assume I'm not the only one to have this problem.
DopplegangerLooks like Amy Winehouse stumbled into a time machine.
The third wheel Oh God, Harold, She's gaining on us, give the man another dollar!
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC, Travel & Vacation)

Let Us Continue: 1964
August 24, 1964. Atlantic City, New Jersey. "View of delegates and stage with large pictures of John F. ... this convention on its website in 2016. (The Gallery, Atlantic City, Politics, Public Figures, TV) ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 03/14/2024 - 12:55pm -

August 24, 1964. Atlantic City, New Jersey. "View of delegates and stage with large pictures of John F. Kennedy, Harry Truman, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Lyndon B. Johnson with the slogan 'Let Us Continue,' at the 1964 Democratic National Convention." 35mm acetate negative by Warren K. Leffler for U.S. News & World Report. View full size.
Convention Hall organI love viewing and reading history about that convention hall, which houses the world's largest pipe organ. I wonder if it was played much at that convention. FWIW, there's a great Facebook page which is documenting the continuing progress on the restoration of that instrument, and a lot of details and aspects of the hall are discussed, too.
Reminds me of MomMy mother was a delegate at that convention. She is on the right of this photo taken at the convention. She and the other woman served President and Mrs. Johnson tea. I never did ask her why, but I'm thinking LBJ probably wanted something a little stronger.
Always The Network With the Best Graphics52 years later and CBS News is still using virtually the same logo seen at this convention on its website in 2016.
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, Politics, Public Figures, TV)

No. 1 Atlantic Ocean: 1910
Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1910. "Young's residence on Million Dollar Pier." The marble-encrusted Venetian "villa" at No. 1 Atlantic Ocean of showman and real-estate developer Captain John Young. Detroit ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 07/26/2012 - 4:52pm -

Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1910. "Young's residence on Million Dollar Pier." The marble-encrusted Venetian "villa" at No. 1 Atlantic Ocean of showman and real-estate developer Captain John Young. Detroit Publishing Co. View full size.
Wishful thinkingDave, any "post-gale" photos of this monstrosity?  This is just too tempting for Mother Nature.
WOW!Which hurricane took it out?
Beach CottageDoes anyone know how long this lasted? I want to move in!
[Captain Young's concrete-and-marble villa, built in 1906 hundreds of feet from the shore on a pier 20 feet above the ocean, survived gales, hurricanes and several boardwalk fires before it fell to the wrecking ball in 1953. - Dave]
Uplifting cultureHe sure liked those alabaster maidens, didn't he?
Well litI'd like to see a night photo of this place. It's covered with hundreds of bulbs. Do you suppose those light-bulb-encrusted flowers blinked?
[The lighting is said to have been designed by none other than Thomas Edison. - Dave]
From a 1910 article in the New York Times:
The Captain is, to make use of his own expression, "a bug on lighting effects." In other words he has a fancy for a lot of light and for a varying in colors. His house is outlined in white electric lights from "cellar to dome," and those peculiar dials near the top are not clocks, but arrangements for giving a constant change to the lighting scheme.
Surrounding the house is a magnificent lawn. It was built on a solid concrete platform with sufficient ventilation to keep the grass from scalding. It is made of the best Pennsylvania soil. The lawn is intersected by broad walks, and artistically distributed are small pine trees set out in large tubs. Statuary is scattered in profusion all about the lawn, and the whole place is surrounded by concrete coping to keep the rains from washing away the lawn. Artistic electroliers have been placed all about the outside of the property, too.
Window DressingCaptain Long did not care much for privacy, it seems.
Fresh fish for dinner!Some images start my mind a wandering; I thought of fishing out the window.  Allegedly Cap'n John landed 30 pounds of fish on his first attempt as reported in the AC Weekly: http://www.acweekly.com/view.php?id=4793 .   Other interesting views of advertising on the boardwalks are at http://library.duke.edu/exhibits/maxwell/index.html .
Everything MatchesIt's hard to imagine now just how popular this overblown style was at the time. Not even counting its unique location on the pier, this house owes a lot to the fantasy-laden grandeur of the World's Fair Beaux Arts style of architecture that came in with the White City in Chicago in 1893. Tiffany & Company even redecorated the White House interiors for Theodore Roosevelt in a style similar to this, although they didn't outline the building in Edison lightbulbs. The party of well-dressed and well-fed tourists in the foreground, especially those Under Full Sail ladies, hold their own against all that marble and plaster.
How utterly charming!It looks like a combination of a dollhouse and a cake. I want so badly to go inside!
House of...If anyone will ever ask me to define the word "kitsch" I'll just show this photograph to them.
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC)

Behind the Boardwalk: 1900
New Jersey circa 1900. "Atlantic City from lighthouse." To be continued! Detroit Publishing Company glass ... all those houses with almost nobody around. Not the Atlantic City I remember! I remember the Atlantic City of the late 60's - ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 07/31/2012 - 2:53pm -

New Jersey circa 1900. "Atlantic City from lighthouse." To be continued! Detroit Publishing Company glass negative. View full size.
Channeling W.C. Fields...Ah, the old Absecon Lighthouse. Yes, indeed. Just like I remember it. What's that you say, young man? Seven dollars to climb to the top? For that kind of money, kid, you're gonna have to carry me up there.
http://www.abseconlighthouse.org/
On the serious side, what a treat to see some of these old beauties of homes in their just-built glory. These in the foreground have a turn-of-the-century tract-house look to them. Then there's the obvious transition going on between indoor plumbing and ye olde outhouse. Probably a welcome change, given what looks to be a cold winter's day down below the lighthouse.
Where'd everybody go?Wonderful photo. I assume it was taken very early in the morning, but it's still eerie to see all those houses with almost nobody around.
Not the Atlantic City I remember!I remember the Atlantic City of the late 60's - early 70's; a run-down place of penny arcades and peep shows.  Sort of like a worn out mistress desperately trying to hold on to her youth.  You also didn't venture too far off the boardwalk - Atlantic City was a dangerous place.
This shot, however, shows Atlantic City at her height and in all her glory.  A vacation mecca for much of the central-eastern US.  Grand homes, hotels with wide verandas, world-class attractions.  What a place it must have been!
What square did I land on?Where are all the green houses and red hotels?
 MissingI kept staring at the houses and their lots because something seemed to be missing. It took me a while but I finally figured it out -- driveways.
Charming old ACThe years have not been kind to Atlantic City. I love the photos on this site of this great city in her heyday. When I ride my bike around AC today, I revel in the hidden bits of faded glory that still exist.
The earlier poster may not have noticed that it is winter. Jersey shore towns tend to get a little desolate in winter. My guess is that hasn't changed much in 100 years.
AC's early Steel PierIf you blow up the high def picture, at middle left you will see two piers into the ocean. The first pier comes into the land and ends in a building with two roof turrets. That is AC's early famed Steel Pier.

The Golden Age of the CupolaThe better to see the Monopoly streets.
Found one old houseI've been browsing this area with Google Earth trying to find even one of those pretty houses which are plenty in the photo. They've been mostly torn out, but I think I found one: It is a four-floor house standing by the S Congress Avenue, on the middle right of the photo. It has a hipped roof with an odd flat appendix on the top of it. Great!
Home ImprovementThat house mentioned by Aarno on South Congress is still there surrounded by a sad and tired emptiness. All of this within a stone's throw of boardwalk casinos.  The house has fairly recently enjoyed the benefit of a crappy vinyl siding job and new windows. There are probably a few more houses standing in the immediate vicinity of Congress Avenue that can be found in the photo.
It is difficult to see the neglect of this area now (and the last 50 years) when contrasted with the pride of craftsmanship from 1905.
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC)

Shore Fastline: 1908
Atlantic City circa 1908. "Virginia Avenue from the Boardwalk." 8x10 inch dry plate ... Publishing Company. View full size. Looks Like Atlantic City was the location of the very first AARP convention! Or was it ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 07/22/2015 - 10:15am -

Atlantic City circa 1908. "Virginia Avenue from the Boardwalk." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.
Looks LikeAtlantic City was the location of the very first AARP convention!  Or was it initially a 55+ only resort?
Babyface Nelson?That baby up against the fence appears to have a goatee!
Trains to Pleasantville!Upon arrival, the photo will become colorized, and the women will toss away their bustles and funny hats, and get uppity!
Sweeney's Billiards, Pool and Bowling AcademySounds like a great place to pick up a Bachelor's Degree.
YikesBefore solid infrastructure - Umm... Where is it now?
Bench WarmersLove to look at these people soaking up the vitamin D and relaxing. Wouldn't it be great to sit there just one day all day and listen to and observe folks of that time. 
Atlantic City & Shore Railroad


American Street Railway Investments, 1908. 

Atlantic City & Shore Railroad. — Incorporated Oct. 21, 1905. This road connects Atlantic City, Pleasantville, Somers Point and Ocean City and by traffic agreement with the West Jersey & Sea Shore R. R., operates cars to Longport.
Plant And Equipment.— Miles of track (electric), 44.8 of which 17 are leased; gauge, 4 ft. 8½ in.; 20 cars; overhead and third rail. Power rented from West Jersey & Sea Shore R. R.

(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC, Railroads, Streetcars)

Atlantic City Lunch: 1953
... Another in a series of professional 8x10 pictures taken in Atlantic City in August 1953 for Better Living Magazine, featuring my in-laws. My ... 
 
Posted by Born Too Late - 06/22/2013 - 5:14pm -

Another in a series of professional 8x10 pictures taken in Atlantic City in August 1953 for Better Living Magazine, featuring my in-laws. My mother-in-law is at the counter. View full size.
Tasty genericIf they were serving Taylor Pork Roll, the sign would have said so. Taylor was king, but there were a few RCs to Taylor's Coke.
Grilled (Taylor) Pork Roll SandwichA fine New Jersey delicacy, possible precursor to fast-food breakfast sandwiches, and a happy childhood memory. 
PennsylvaniaDutch Birch Beer 10c
ZarfSee the conical paper cups and the metal thingies they go in?
Those are zarfs.
Grilled Tasty Pork RollThe most expensive item being hawked on the signage, and a New Jersey staple.  Interesting to see it being featured at Atlantic City, so far from its home in Trenton.
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

Atlantic & Pacific: 1907
Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1907. "St. Nicholas Church, Pacific and Tennessee ... to no good. Not on my Monopoly board Having visited Atlantic City but once, it is difficult for me to think of it as a normal town ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 03/18/2021 - 11:26am -

Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1907. "St. Nicholas Church, Pacific and Tennessee Avenues." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.
Reprobates?Based on my own misspent youth, it appears those boys to the left of the church are up to no good.
Not on my Monopoly boardHaving visited Atlantic City but once, it is difficult for me to think of it as a normal town with churches and grocery stores and such.  I don’t remember Boardwalk Empire as being heavily populated by the “normal” either!
Now if the spires displayed gold letters spelling
T
R
U
M
P ....
Fresh GroundIt would be holy [sic] appropriate, then, if the post-service convivium featured refreshment made possible by a classic A&P Eight O'Clock coffee grinder (the sort of which was omnipresent in grocery stores of the not-so-distant past).
Ground for this church was broken not so very long before this image was captured, as construction was completed in 1905.  And it still stands!  (I was prepared to discover this would be yet another church to face the wrecking ball.)
  Quite the tangle   Power line work by the local electric company has left the top of this utility pole looking like the aftermath of an explosion in a spaghetti factory.
   The carbon arc light suspended above the street brings back memories of the old movie projectors. For a couple of summers during my adolescence I was friends with  the projectionist at one of the local drive-in theaters. I would go to work with him different nights and learned to operate the projectors. One of the neat things was watching for the little circle of light to flash on the bottom right of the screen to signal when to start the second projector. When the circle flashed again you opened the shutter on the second projector and shut off the first projector. If done correctly  it was seamless. I don't remember exactly long each reel of film lasted but there were a lot changes in a two hour movie. Add that to the standard double feature starting about nine o'clock and you had yourself a hot summer night.
  Now I've Robert Palmer and those girls in my head.
What were they looking at?The St. Nicholas of Tolentine Catholic Church, circa 1907, is a beautiful church.  But I wonder what parish it serves? Today it's surrounded by mostly low price hotels and parking lots.
This picture captures some great moments.  At left is a group of boys, circled around something, all staring down intently.  No doubt it was something only boys would find fascinating.  While around the corner are the girls, grouped at the top of the steps.  You can almost hear the giggling.  I also like the man up against the wall, with his thumbs in his vest, posing for the photographer. 

Then and NowLooking at the magnificent structure in 1907, one is aware of its huge size, and with the spartan number of people around makes it seem even more huge and out of sync with reality. Skip forward to 2021 and it seems not many more people are around than 114 years before.
In reply to Rob EllieCarbon rods, positive and negative or sometimes two negatives, were used in projection world wide up until around the 1960s when xenon filled high pressure glass bulbs were introduced. Both consumed large amperage but at low voltages, based on the size of the rectifiers supplying the DC current, the size of the screen, and the size of the carbon rods and xenon lamps, ranging anywhere from 5mm to 30mm diameter or more for the carbon rods to 1000 watts to 15000 watts for xenons, depending on whether the screen was small or huge such as Imax. The latest technology is laser powered light sources in some locations. The xenon lamps are used for both film (now rare) and digital projection. 
Carbon arcs were also the norm for film studio lighting, in combination with sealed lamps. Carbon arc light was very intense, needed especially for early slow speed film stock. It was also the closest natural color temperature to daylight.
Film spools were usually around 1000 feet in the era of flammable nitrate film and then when safety film was developed around the early 1950s, 2000 feet became the industry norm for shipping and most projection, until larger spools, example 6000 feet started being used in some cinemas in the 1960s, leading to the entire film (35mm or 70mm) being held on horizontal 'platters' introduced around the early 1980s, all systems that were joined up by the projectionist from the delivered  2000 foot spool. A 2000 foot spool ran for about 20 minutes when full. 
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC)

Atlantic City: 1945
My father, William Hager, on his honeymoon in Atlantic City. The boardwalk or pier is in the background, 1945. It's a pier ... 
 
Posted by hager2007 - 02/02/2010 - 9:57am -

My father, William Hager, on his honeymoon in Atlantic City. The boardwalk or pier is in the background, 1945.
It's a pierYour father was standing near the inlet, in front of the Garden Pier.
But I question the date: Atlantic City itself bought the privately owned pier in early 1944. That ballroom at the back was destroyed by a hurricane that fall. 
If this picture was really taken in 1945, the man would be standing in front of a mass of twisted steel and jagged columns.
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

The Bathing Hour: 1910
Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1910. "The bathing hour." 8x10 inch dry plate glass ... donkeys, ponies and horses are no problem! Gritty Atlantic City Had they not invented the beach towel by 1910? Talk about sand ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 08/14/2012 - 2:10pm -

Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1910. "The bathing hour." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.
Holiday weekend?One of the biggest crowds seen on Shorpy at the beach. I notice that there is a long line of pilings out into the ocean. It looks like the remains of one of the docks that might have been destroyed by the big hurricane of 1903.
Was a Sunny Day!  Imagine a hot summer day and the ladies fully dressed on the beach, rolling in the sand and water with those outfits on. What's worse is horses on the beach! Watch your step please.
This way, folksWe've got a spot open down by the woman in the black bathing suit.
Horse senseNow we see why so many people, particularly the ladies, always wore shoes at the beach. Watch your step!
Bathing folksI want to personally thank two people: the gal looking at the camera with that winsome smile, and Paul Newman, for going back in time and standing in front of that camera over in the middle of the shot.
No Dogs Allowed On BeachHowever, goats, donkeys, ponies and horses are no problem!
Gritty Atlantic CityHad they not invented the beach towel by 1910? Talk about sand in yer pants!
NostalgiaAs Burt Lancaster said in "Atlantic City," "The Atlantic Ocean was really something in those days."
The focus of this pictureseems to be the lovely lady in the foreground looking  directly at the camera.
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC, Horses, Swimming)

Atlantic City Forever (Colorized): 1912
Yet another in my string of Atlantic City colorizations, this one taken in front of Richard's Baths. The original ... 
 
Posted by scottr - 05/17/2011 - 8:47am -

Yet another in my string of Atlantic City colorizations, this one taken in front of Richard's Baths. The original b&w is here. 
I went looking to see if I could find any information about the historical color of Richard's Baths.  I found a newsletter which references this very photograph, and mentions that Richard's Baths were a dark maroon color.  The purply color I came up with after much experimentation was the best I could approximate it.  
The newsletter is available as a pdf file.
This photo only took about ten hours to colorize, which means I'm getting better! View full size.
Absolutely astonishing!Wow! Absolutely astonishing!  I’m impressed that it only took 10 hours.  Truly outstanding.
(Colorized Photos)

Steel Pier, Atlantic City
Model of the Steel Pier at Atlantic City with Ford display circa 1940. View full size. Steel Pier model ... 
 
Posted by John.Debold - 08/23/2008 - 7:25pm -

Model of the Steel Pier at Atlantic City with Ford display circa 1940. View full size.
Steel Pier modelThis is fantastic!  Was it displayed at the World's Fair?  I hope it was preserved in a museum.
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

Atlantic City 1961
Walking the beach at Atlantic City in 1961 - long before the casinos popped up. Photo: Don Hall, Sr. ... 
 
Posted by notycoon22 - 07/02/2007 - 10:59pm -

Walking the beach at Atlantic City in 1961 - long before the casinos popped up.
Photo: Don Hall, Sr.
Don Hall
Yreka, CA
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

Atlantic City: 1945
... My Mother, Wanda Jo (Farrell) Hager, on her honeymoon in Atlantic City, 1945. (ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery) ... 
 
Posted by hager2007 - 02/02/2010 - 9:59am -

My Mother, Wanda Jo (Farrell) Hager, on her honeymoon in Atlantic City, 1945.
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

Atlantic City: 1956
My grandfather won a trip to Atlantic City in 1956. He bought a small camera and began taking hundreds of pictures, ... 
 
Posted by KAP - 09/21/2013 - 2:24am -

My grandfather won a trip to Atlantic City in 1956.  He bought a small camera and began taking hundreds of pictures, mostly of life in and around eastern Ohio.  This is from one of his Kodachrome slides. View full size.
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

Jack at Atlantic City: 1935
... and unidentified characters on the beach at Atlantic City, with the Chalfonte-Haddon Hall (now Resorts) rising in the background. ... 
 
Posted by adamgilson - 05/08/2015 - 7:43pm -

My grandfather (the kid), great-grandmother, and unidentified characters on the beach at Atlantic City, with the Chalfonte-Haddon Hall (now Resorts) rising in the background. Circa 1935. View full size.
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

Atlantic City Forever (Colorized): 1912
Colorized from this Shorpy original. View full size. Some Dough Re Me Wow, great job. Now you can see the outline of the rectangular wallet (?) the male poser has tucked in his tights under his shirt. I'm continually amazed how yo ... 
 
Posted by stennesrc - 12/06/2013 - 8:43pm -

Colorized from this Shorpy original. View full size.
Some Dough Re MeWow, great job.  Now you can see the outline of the rectangular wallet (?) the male poser has tucked in his tights under his shirt.  I'm continually amazed how you guys who color photographs do it.  
(Colorized Photos)

Bleak House: 1901
... Shore circa 1901. "The Boardwalk and Auditorium Pier, Atlantic City." At Ocean Avenue, George Coryell's Bleak House hotel. View full size. ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 01/03/2019 - 11:06am -

The Jersey Shore circa 1901. "The Boardwalk and Auditorium Pier, Atlantic City." At Ocean Avenue, George Coryell's Bleak House hotel. View full size.
The Jersey ShoreCirca 1901 BK  (Before Kardashians)
What the world needs.Right there under the billiards sign. It has to be a good one of course.
No litterbugs allowedWhat caught my eye was the cleanliness of both the boardwalk and the beach. No sign of litter.
Bleak HouseNot recommended for the depressed.
If you've ever been to Atlantic CityWATCH the tram car, please.
Bad branding, quickly addressed"Bleak House," Charles Dickens' biting satire of the plodding operation of England's chancery courts, was a better book than a brand. Within two years, this hotel reopened under a new name (Hotel Lenox).  
What? Not one "Going Out of Business" shop.As a youngster in the '50s we were annual visitors to Atlantic City and while walking the Boardwalk I noticed that the same shops in the same locations which were going out of business in 1950 were also going out in 1951, 1952, 1953, etc.
The same owners were selling the same merchandise as the year before. The first year I always bugged my parents to stop since we surely could get some great bargains but,  being wise to the world of merchandising, they just kept on walking by as I did the following years. 
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC, Stores & Markets, Swimming)

Atlantic City Forever (Colorized):1912
Colorized from this Shorpy original. View full size. (Colorized Photos) ... 
 
Posted by SirCarl - 01/07/2016 - 11:30am -

Colorized from this Shorpy original. View full size.
(Colorized Photos)

Pittsburgh: 1941
... lot of onion-dome ethnic churches all over town. The 1941 City Directory lists a Wm. James Confectionery at 7314 Tioga Street, which is ... chain of hair salons and spas. Morrow Triangle Atlantic ave is a one-way northward running street to the east of downtown. ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 01/17/2023 - 2:46pm -

June 1941. "Rain. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania." Medium format acetate negative by John Vachon for the Farm Security Administration. View full size.
I love the rain...This photo immediately brings forth the smell of rain, the hiss of car tires as they pass and the drip drip drip of rainwater off the eaves of the porch.
Pittsburgh by VachonThis is a beautiful picture. John Vachon's photos did not have the pathos and personal drama of Dorothea Lange's work, but more than any other American photographer, he has left an invaluable scrapbook of the vernacular American landscape. He is my favorite photographer. 
What are the towers ...... in the background? Is that another church? Looks Orthodox. Perhaps someone familiar with Pittsburgh will know.
A Rainy DayThe person walking with the umbrella really makes the photograph work. You can almost feel the rain..
Pittsburgh PrecipitationI agree with others here about the evocative quality of this photo.  Staring at this for a few moments I swear I can hear the rain coming down!
Canada Dry SpurCanada Dry Spur ("the cola drink with Canada Dry quality") was Canada Dry's attempt at entering the cola wars. By this time of course the company was owned by P.D. Saylor and Associates and the only connection with Canada was the name.
Such a wonderIt's 103 degrees on my front porch (yes, that's in the shade), my part of Arizona hasn't seen rain in 3 or 4 months. Guess whats going on my desktop. Thanks.
DSS
Look how it falls straight down!Not only can I relate to DSS since we don't get a lot of rain in West Texas, but I'm just amazed at how it's coming *straight down*. (Huge gusts of wind aren't sucking her umbrella inside out, and the rain isn't coming in sideways and raising welts on her skin!)
P.S. Not that I'm complaining...I love it here, and my glasses usually protect my eyes from the infrequent SIDEWAYS rainstorms!
Tioga Street, PittsburghPittsburgh has a lot of onion-dome ethnic churches all over town. The 1941 City Directory lists a Wm. James Confectionery at 7314 Tioga Street, which is where Point Breeze meets Homewood meets nothing original still standing. This would be east of downtown.
South Side P-BurgThis looks like the "South Side" of Pittsburgh and if I am not mistaken, this is an orthodox church which is now the private home and studio of the owner of the number one Pittsburgh chain of hair salons and spas. 
Morrow TriangleAtlantic ave is a one-way northward running street to the east of downtown.  The only intersection that makes a bend like the one photographed is at Liberty and Baum.  There are no row homes or churches there now though.
The vantage point of the photo is a parklet called Morrow Triangle.  The filling station and church are now the site of a car dealer.  Unless there was a street name change that the Atlantic ave in the picture is different from the current Atlantic ave I think I'm right.
[The "Atlantic" sign is advertising a brand of gasoline. - Dave]
It's SouthsideI've lived in Pittsburgh all my life and this shot looks remarkably like the Southside (flats) to me just off Carson Street. Many churches of similar Greek Orthodox venue there. A previous poster indicated he thought that Atlantic sign was a street. It looks like a gas station to me, or something else.
It's DeutschtownThis is the corner of Madison and Lockhart, looking west. The church with the onion domes is St. Mary's -- Bavarian Catholic, believe it or not.
You can't go and see this intersection anymore since it was destroyed in the 1980s so that the Parkway North could be built. The church is still there, although now it's a hotel.

Pressley StreetThe previous comment is correct. That's St. Mary's (now known as the Priory) which sits at 614 Pressley Street.
Atlantic GasThe Atlantic sign is for the gas station. Atlantic petroleum was founded in Philly, then eventually acquired by Sunoco in the 80's or 90's.    
(The Gallery, John Vachon, Pittsburgh)

On the Beach: 1906
New Jersey circa 1906. "The beach, Atlantic City." The right half of a panorama formed with this image . Detroit ... fast-food has made through the years. The beach, Atlantic City - revisited Note the differing shadows in the two parts of S. ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 08/13/2012 - 8:19pm -

New Jersey circa 1906. "The beach, Atlantic City." The right half of a panorama formed with this image. Detroit Publishing Co. glass negative. View full size.
PanoramaHere's a stitched together version of the panorama. Click to enlarge.

ChapeauxGlad the photographer happened by on Funny Hat Day.
No fast foodI'm always impressed how everyone is so slim and fit looking in their bathing suits in 1906.  What a difference fast-food has made through the years.
The beach, Atlantic City - revisitedNote the differing shadows in the two parts of S. Head's stitched-together panorama -- the pictures weren't taken simultaneously.
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC, Swimming)
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