MAY CONTAIN NUTS
HOME

Search Shorpy

SEARCH TIP: Click the tags above a photo to find more of same:
Mandatory field.

Search results -- 30 results per page


Forest Coupe: 1926
... a B-17 in which he was flying was forced to ditch in the ocean where the crew tooks to life rafts. They were adrift for 24 days, being ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 05/18/2015 - 11:57am -

San Francisco, 1926. "Rickenbacker in woods." Another automotive marque not long for this world. 5x7 glass negative by Christopher Helin. View full size.
A car worthy of its nameWas the motto of this company founded by Eddie Rickenbacker, a hero in both World Wars.  He used his World War I 94th Fighter Squadron emblem depicting a top hat inside a ring on both the front and rear of his cars and the radiator cap ornament is a plane.  He was a man of uncompromisable integrity and when his company failed he saw to it that the investors were repaid out of his own pockets.  In 1942, a B-17 in which he was flying was forced to ditch in the ocean where the crew tooks to life rafts.  They were adrift for 24 days, being reported lost, when they were spotted by a float plane and rescued.
Fore!That looks a lot like the nineteenth at Lincoln.  I've lost many a ball among those trees.
Four-Wheel BrakesThe Rickenbacker was the first car to standardize 4-wheel brakes (in 1923), which the competition then claimed (and much of the public believed) could cause a vehicle to flip over if applied during a turn.  One can't help but wonder what any four-legged critter that could talk would have to say about that theory.
Twilight ZoneMr. Bevis drove a late 1924 Rickenbacker in the Twilight Zone Season 1, Episode 33 "Mr. Bevis" (aired 3 June 1960). Car appears at this point:
https://youtu.be/gGQze3s2S08?t=158
(The Gallery, Cars, Trucks, Buses, Chris Helin, San Francisco)

Swim Class: 1905
... Florida circa 1905. "Surf bathing at Palm Beach." No ocean was ever a prettier shade of gray. 8x10 glass negative, Detroit ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 06/05/2014 - 3:06pm -

Florida circa 1905. "Surf bathing at Palm Beach." No ocean was ever a prettier shade of gray. 8x10 glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.
A water windmill On a pier. Why?
[Generate power for whatever goes on in that building? -tterrace]
Help me into the water too, please!Okay, that  guy in the front helping his son (daughter?) navigate the waves is a definite hottie in my book (the biceps alone--woweee). Rather tricky to deal with a crush on a man over 130 years old though, so I will just admire how he nicely fills out his bathing suit from a distance -- a very loooong distance.
The windmillIf you follow a line down from it you can see that the pylon below it is slightly wider than all the rest. It seems to have a pipe attached to it.
It must have been to pipe fresh water, either from a well or more likely a pipe leading from shore to that hut.
In any event it is not the sort of windmill one would use for generating electricity. They had been developed in Denmark about 15 years before this but they were MUCH larger.
from 1889:
(The Gallery, Boats & Bridges, DPC, Florida, Kids, Swimming)

Wildwood Casino: 1910
... fascinated me, with the many blocks it's lost to the ocean and the ghosts of an abandoned World War II base that is also eroding ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 08/20/2012 - 2:05pm -

The Jersey Shore circa 1910. "Casino and pier, Wildwood." A popular amenity: "Bathing robes to hire." Detroit Publishing glass negative. View full size.
Loving these south Jersey photosFirst Cape May, now Wildwood. Keep 'em coming! As one commenter said on the Cape May Point life saving station photo, the area has a distinguished history. Cape May Point has always fascinated me, with the many blocks it's lost to the ocean and the ghosts of an abandoned World War II base that is also eroding away.
Steamers"Hot Sea-Water-Baths"
Sounds like something you'd give a lobster, crab or clam. May I have a little melted butter and lemon with that?
What does it refer to?I have seen the word "casino" used to describe old-time establishments like this. They are usually seaside bathing places from around the early 1900s, and have no association with gambling. Anybody know the origin of this usage of "casino"?
["Casino" (Italian for house) generally means any structure used for social amusements, including gambling. - Dave]
(The Gallery, DPC, Sports)

Where the Bogs Are: 1911
... the bogs raked and flooded and the cranberries collected. Ocean Spray's headquarters were in this area of Massachusetts. Amazing! ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 05/06/2016 - 10:11am -

September 1911. "Crowded tenement used by cranberry pickers ('Bravas' or 'black Portuguese,' from the islands of Cape Verde) in bogs near Wareham, Massachusetts." Gelatin silver print by Lewis Wickes Hine. View full size.
Toys for poor kids?Reminds me of the barnyard in Croatia 30 years ago where my 3-year-old nephew's favorite toy was a live chicken. He'd grab one and hang on for dear life. Great fun. ("You'd be wise to leave that big rooster alone.") 
Still plenty of bogsThere are still many bogs in the area. When I was a younger lots of us kids got part time jobs picking cranberries. It's quite interesting to see the bogs raked and flooded and the cranberries collected. Ocean Spray's headquarters were in this area of Massachusetts.
Amazing!Here we see replicated many of the conditions of an inner-city tenement block in what otherwise was probably a very bucolic setting.
(The Gallery, Kids, Lewis Hine)

T-Wharf: 1903
... were not powerful enough to drag the trawl nets along the ocean floor but steam could provide the needed power. The introduction of trawl ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 07/31/2015 - 5:00pm -

Circa 1903. "Unloading fish at 'T' wharf, Boston, Mass." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.
CodfishI believe these are cod fishing schooners. The telltale signs are the baskets of coiled line and the stack of dories on each ship. Prior to modern trawling, cod was fished with long lines of baited hooks. Multiple groups of fisherman would set out from the mother ship in the dories and and handfish for the cod with the coiled lines. Each fisherman's take was carefully tallied so that they would receive their appropriate share when the entire hold was sold at market. All that changed with the introduction of steam powered fishing boats. Sailboats were not powerful enough to drag the trawl nets along the ocean floor but steam could provide the needed power. The introduction of trawl nets, which essentially scoop up everything on the bottom, forever changed the marine ecosystems of Georges and Grand Banks, eventually leading to decimation of the cod stocks today. 
Salt BankersLots to be learned from this photo. As Stanton Square says, it would be cod that the ships are carrying, most likely filleted and salted, as described in Kipling's "Captains Courageous."
But what's not well known is the carts tipped up to receive the catch and the well-dressed men -- not stevedores, surely -- who seem to be there to negotiate price and how much of the catch they are prepared to buy.
Technical types who have read Chapelle's "American Fishing Schooners" will recognize the vessels as post-"Fredonia" and therefore recent in the time of the photo. 
(The Gallery, Boats & Bridges, Boston, DPC)

Dune Buggy: 1926
... for the N Judah Line, which opened in 1928. It ends at Ocean Beach. -tterrace] Streetcar Tracks The girder rail and close ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 09/08/2017 - 8:57am -

San Francisco, 1926. "Paige sedan -- Great Highway." The perambulating Paige last spied here. 5x7 glass negative by Christopher Helin. View full size.
Question!That does not look like normal railroad track.  Any idea as to what is going on?
[Streetcar tracks, possibly for the N Judah Line, which opened in 1928. It ends at Ocean Beach. -tterrace]
Streetcar TracksThe girder rail and close spacing of the two tracks are dead giveaways.
Watch the GrooveIndeed, those tracks are for what we always called "streetcars." Had to be careful of the groove. Schwinn bike tires could drop in and jam up. I had a Murray Ohio which had fatter tires. Still, steer clear of the groove.
I remember in the 50s that there were men in their large coveralls who lubricated the curved tracks. The only sand dunes left were at the future site of St. Ignatius High School in the outer Sunset District. My parents' house, southeast of this shot, had just been built in 1924. Framed in solid redwood, rough cut. Lath and plaster walls. Lovely homes for working class families.
(The Gallery, Cars, Trucks, Buses, Chris Helin, Railroads, San Francisco)

Ahead of the Curve: 1955
... at this beautiful hotel. After checking rates for a humble Ocean Front Junior Suite with Balcony, three days would come to only ... ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 08/04/2013 - 2:18pm -

March 30, 1955. "Fontainebleau Hotel, Miami Beach. Over pool to hotel. Morris Lapidus, client." The luxe hostelry's first "season" after its opening. Large-format acetate negative by Gottscho-Schleisner. View full size.
In My DreamsOh, to make a reservation at this beautiful hotel. After checking rates for a humble Ocean Front Junior Suite with Balcony, three days would come to only ... $2,000.06
Wow. In my dreams!  
'The Architecture of Joy'... Architect Morris Lapidus cared not a wit for style, trend or artistic dictum. He simply piled together everything he thought people would enjoy!
(The Gallery, Florida, Gottscho-Schleisner, Miami)

New Magnolia: 1906
... Second class or Third class, much like accommodations on ocean liners. By the turn of the twentieth century it was generally expected ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 11/15/2018 - 1:47pm -

1906. "The New Magnolia, Magnolia, Massachusetts." Completed in 1891, this resort hotel near Gloucester was destroyed by fire in 1907. 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.
A familiar fateIsn't it amazing how many of the grand old hotels built around this time were eventually destroyed by fire, and usually in a relatively short time after they were constructed?
Toilet inquirySerious question to Shorphites: What were the toilet arrangements in fine old hotels like this. Did rooms have their own "Victorian bathrooms," or were there several communal ones on each floor? Or were private baths limited to the expensive suites? 
Re: Toilet Inquirey Prior to the Great War most English language travel guides tended to classify hotels as being First class, Second class or Third class, much like accommodations on ocean liners. By the turn of the twentieth century it was generally expected that hotels of the Second Class would have indoor plumbing. And hotels of the First Class were expected to have a large percentage of their rooms equipped with en-suite bath and water-closet facilities. Third class establishments were hit and miss in terms of their sanitary facilities, with some still using old fashioned chamber pots collected by the hotels staff. 
Toilet ArrangementsI grew up in a hotel that was built in 1906. Very few of our rooms had direct toilet access, even in the 1960s when my parents ran the hotel. Every room had a sink and a mirror. Rooms that didn't include a toilet rented for $5 a night. Every floor had a public bathroom that people who rented those rooms used. The second floor bathroom included a shower, the only one available to guests in the hotel. (Even our apartment, created from several adjoining rooms, only had a bathtub.) A room with semiprivate access to a toilet and sometimes a bathtub rented for $7 a night. The bathroom was situated between two hotel rooms, with a door on either side. You had to make sure the other door was locked when you were using it. Now, our hotel wasn't the fanciest - it had been built to service railroad passengers. Maybe a bigger, fancier place such as the Magnolia had better toilet access. But that was how our hotel was designed. After we moved out in the early 1970s, the place was torn down. It's a parking lot now, but I will never forget growing up there.
(The Gallery, DPC)

Radio U: 1921
... if you Google it. CPOS Canadian Pacific Steamships Ocean Service to be exact. Founded in 1915 with the merger of Canadian Pacific ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 09/11/2011 - 8:40pm -

"Loomis Radio School." Circa 1921, another look inside the technical school started by Mary Loomis in Washington, D.C. National Photo. View full size.
O Canada.Hi there,  Could we possibly get a blow up of the Canada poster? I'd love to see what it says! Thanks!

Canadian Pacific Overseas ServiceA part of the Canadian Pacific Railway.  Lots of good stuff if you Google it.
CPOSCanadian Pacific Steamships Ocean Service to be exact. Founded in 1915 with the merger of Canadian Pacific Steamships and the Allan Line, the company later became CP Ships and in 2005 was bought by TUI AG and is in the process of merging with their Hapag-Lloyd line. In its heyday as a passenger line, the company was renowned for its Empress fleet including the Empress of Britain and the Empress of Canada. Although the line was owned by Canadian Pacific the passenger ships at least were built and registered in Britain.
(The Gallery, D.C., Education, Schools, Natl Photo)

Choices: 1939
... somewhere warmer Up in the mountains, down by the ocean Where don't matter long as we're goin' Somewhere together, I got a ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 05/15/2019 - 1:51pm -

June 1939. "Signs at highway intersection. Three Forks, Montana." Medium format acetate negative by Arthur Rothstein for the Farm Security Administration. View full size.
What's the third fork?Two roads diverged on the lone prairie, and if you made a hard left, you'd eventually end up in Yellowstone, which I guess is the third fork, assuming you've put Bozeman behind you. (I know the name of the town refers to the river drainage, but that was my first thought.)
Side note: I had to listen to this song to decide whether it's in or on "the lone prairie". It's on. That's the difference between Robert Frost's forest landscape, and a rather treeless one. You are in one, and on the other.
I got a quarterThose signs remind me of the Jo Dee Messina song from the '90s ...
Heads Carolina, tails California
Somewhere greener, somewhere warmer
Up in the mountains, down by the ocean
Where don't matter long as we're goin'
Somewhere together, I got a quarter
Heads Carolina, tails California ...
Three ForksThree Forks is named after the three forks of the Missouri River. The Gallatin, Madison, & Jefferson Rivers.
A less exciting sign of the times.At least the hills are still there. 

(The Gallery, Arthur Rothstein, On the Road)

Schlitz Hotel: 1910
... 1910. "Schlitz Hotel, Atlantic City." On the Boardwalk at Ocean Avenue. 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 10/14/2016 - 9:47pm -

Circa 1910. "Schlitz Hotel, Atlantic City." On the Boardwalk at Ocean Avenue.  8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.
Beer Hotels?I see that the Schlitz Hotel has the same logo as the brewery and next door (to our left) is the Blatz Hotel. That was (is?) another brewery from back in the day. Did these breweries own lodgings? I know that they did run restaurants that showcased their products. Also, these hotels were in Atlantic City, a long way from Milwaukee, and that beer didn't travel that well in those days, was there a locally-owned brewery?
[The sign next door is for Blatt Royal, a haberdashery. - tterrace]
Lovely Stained GlassSuch interesting buildings. I love the designs and visual interest each have. The details, such as the stained glass awning at the Schlitz entrance and the transom on the other hotel. I bet they were gorgeous when backlit in the late evening or night. Also the turret corner is lovely. The Bank is my favorite with all the beautiful ironwork. Too bad we don't have such interesting and pretty details on buildings today. Instead most of what we have today is a square, bland Lego block style. IMHO they are depressing to look at.
(The Gallery, Atlantic City, DPC)

The Bonded Woman: 1922
... : "Angela Gaskell travels and sails around the Pacific Ocean to rescue the man she loves, John Somers. Her task takes her from San ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 09/19/2016 - 9:04pm -

        Now playing at the Granada: Betty Compson in "The Bonded Woman," accompanied by Paul Ash and his Synco-Symphonists, with Wallace at the organ.
San Francisco, 1922. "Foster & Kleiser billboard." 8x10 inch nitrate negative, late of the Wyland Stanley and Marilyn Blaisdell collections. View full size.
Bonded but not BrandedIt's odd that an Adolph Zukor film wasn't billed as a Paramount Pictures release, since he was one of the principals of that company. Anyone know why?
[The parent company was The Famous Players-Lasky Corp. East coast productions were made under Zukor's supervision and billed "Adolph Zukor Presents," while those supervised by his partner at the west coast studio, "Jesse L. Lasky Presents." -tterrace]
Betty CompsonShe was 25 at the time of this movie, and lived to age 77.  From IMDb on The Bonded Woman:  "Angela Gaskell travels and sails around the Pacific Ocean to rescue the man she loves, John Somers. Her task takes her from San Francisco bondage-servitude to a dance-hall in Honolulu to a remote South Seas island. She survives a shipwreck along the way."
(The Gallery, Movies, San Francisco, W. Stanley)

Me, 1930s
... as one taken during the 1930's. Possibly taken near the ocean. I wish I could read the sign that is hanging there, I think it could be ... 
 
Posted by mhallack - 02/01/2010 - 7:59pm -

The only caption on this photo says "Me." I am assuming this is my grandfather Frank Hallack in his early 20's, which would make this photo as one taken during the 1930's. Possibly taken near the ocean. I wish I could read the sign that is hanging there, I think it could be something related to the Pacific Electric red cars line. View full size.
Sign Over "Me"The hanging sign reads "HYPERION". To me, the name brings to mind Walt Disney's 1925-1938 studio at 2719 Hyperion Ave. in Los Angeles' Silverlake District. Possibly the Red Cars had a Hyperion line or Hyperion station?
"Hyperion"I'm thinking it has to be for the Hyperion Bridge. Thanks for having better eyesight than me.
Hyperion (Bridge)Well, that's what it looks like to me.  Googling Pacific Electric Red Car Hyperion took me here.
I hope that I'm right and that this helps you in decoding this image.
HyperionThe Pacific Electric Railway ran along the Santa Monica Bay beaches. Hyperion was a stop near where Imperial Highway ends at the beach. I believe that is where this photo was taken. 
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

Name That Ship!
... off its starboard quarter) were the last passenger luxury ocean liners ever built in the United States. Parts for their construction ... 
 
Posted by Jim Page - 09/21/2012 - 9:35pm -

Another slide from the past. This ship may be, according to a web history I found, the Argentina, but my recollection from those days was that it was named the Amazon Princess or something similar. 
My dad worked on the vessel as an electrician during slack periods in his flying, and he took me up in his float plane to watch it being launched. It was 1958 or so at the Ingalls Shipyard in Pascagoula, Mississippi.
I was in the first grade, so my memory is rather hazy regarding details. Dad had built a little ramp/turntable tiedown for his pontoon-fitted Super Cub on the Pascagoula River not far from the F.B. Walker and Sons Dry Dock. I have several photos of all that if anyone is interested in seeing them. View full size.
See more photos?Jim Page, we are Shorpy-ites, so, of course, we want to see more photos!
Plus, I grew up in Gulfport, so this is close to home.
TwinsThese two ships (the white hulled one on the left and the one to its right that is surrounded by scaffolding and has a crane off its starboard quarter) were the last passenger luxury ocean liners ever built in the United States.  Parts for their construction were gathered from all of the (then) 48 states.
Bidding $24,444,181 per ship, Ingalls Shipyards—still the largest private employer in Mississippi—had won the contract from Moore-McCormack Lines to build replacements for aging ships of the same names that had been built in 1928.  The earlier ships were owned by the United States Federal Maritime Board and operated by Moore-McCormack Lines.  As part of a $3,500,000,000 program to rebuild America’s merchant marine fleet, the Federal Maritime Board contributed about $20,000,000 toward the cost of building the two new passenger liners.
They were known by many names during their more than 45-year careers.  Perhaps some of us sailed on them without knowing their original names.
On the left is the S.S. Brasil (correct spelling), which was launched on December 16, 1957.   Renamed the Universe for scrapping, she was beached at Alang, India in late 2004.  From 1996 to 2004, as the Universe Explorer, she had been part of the Semester at Sea program sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh and administered by the Institute for Shipboard Education.
During her career she had been known as: Brasil (1958-72); Volendam (1972-75); Monarch Sun (1975-78); Volendam (again, 1978-84); Island Sun (floating hotel in  Quebec, 1984-85); Liberté (1985-87); Canada Star (1987-89); Queen of Bermuda (1989-90);, Enchanted Seas (1990-95); and Universe Explorer (1995-2004).  In Hong Kong for extensive refurbishing to return her to cruise ship status, she was instead sold to scrappers in November 2004 and renamed Universe.  Later that month the Universe, f/k/a S.S. Brasil sailed for Alang, India, where she was beached at high tide on December 7, 2004.
-   -   -
The one to her right is her sister ship, the S.S. Argentina, which was launched on March 12, 1958.  Renamed New Orleans for scrapping, she was beached at Alang, India in December 2003.
During her career she had been known as: Argentina (1958-72); Veendam (1972-72); Brasil (1974-76); Monarch Star (1976-78); Veendam (again, 1978-84); Bermuda Star (1984-90); Enchanted Isle (1990-94); Hotel Commodore (floating hotel in St. Petersburg, Russia, 1994-95);, Enchanted Isle (again, 1995-2003).  On December 30, 2000 the Enchanted Isle docked at Violet, Louisiana after her owner declared bankruptcy.
Between December 30, 2000 and September 5, 2003 the  Enchanted Isle was sold a number of times, but never left the dock.  On September 6 the last buyer renamed her New Orleans and soon began repairs that would allow her to sail under her own power to the breakers in Alang, India.  The New Orleans,  f/k/a S.S. Argentina, arrived there on December 4, 2003 and was beached five days later.
Information on the full careers of both the S.S. Brasil and the S.S. Argentina can be found here on the right side of the list under "The Modern Fleet (1958 to 1969)."
Another site with great pictures can be found here.  Be sure to follow the "SS Brasil & Argentina to SS Universe Explorer INDEX" links at the bottom of the page.
Yes, More PhotosI would love to see what photos you have from that time frame. I was 23 yrs old when I started work at Ingalls in July 1957 as a helper in the Fab Shop. I remember the Brasil and Argentina very well. That is the Brasil on #1 Way, apparently being launched. Argentina is just south of her.
By 1958 I was a pipe welder working on the Eagle Tankers and the destroyers. After suffering through a couple of layoffs, like all shipyard workers, I eventually became a piping inspector in the nuclear submarine program and then advanced to a test director. That was the most enjoyable time of my working career. Sea trials with Admiral Hyman Rickover, first dives to test depth, working with ships crews to complete the construction, idiot officers and competent enlisted men, freedom to perform what needed to be done to get the job done and many stories to tell - most of which people would tend not believe. Of all the Boats I worked on, Haddock was my favorite.  I left Ingalls in 1974 when they ended their participation in the Submarine program and joined the Bechtel Power Corporation. They were a fine company to work for and took me all over the United States and part of the far east working on nuclear power plants. I have many tales to tell that would probably bore the horns off of a Billy Goat.
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

P-51 Mustang: 1970
... of the car when the "maroon and gold Mustang" raced over Ocean Beach at about 1,000 feet headed toward the Golden Gate. The other time ... 
 
Posted by Cerrito68 - 10/08/2012 - 6:33pm -

Taken at the annual Watsonville, California airshow in 1970, this is a privately-owned P-51 Mustang WWII fighter plane that I saw many times flying (low) over the San Francisco Bay Area. View full size.
Great shot of the MustangCertainly a non military paint scheme. Hope she's still around today.
Here is the airplane today...I searched the site "Mustangs-Mustangs" and ran through the alphabet for a suffix to the "N" number that is just barely showing on the right side. When I reached the letter "D" I struck pay dirt. 
Its history shows that it was based in California from 1965 to 2003. The FAA registry shows that it is currently based in Vineburg CA and still registered to "Sonoma Valley Aircraft Sales"
It now sports a new paint scheme and "N" number of N51GP. Its original WWII s/n is 44-74483. It is a "D" model Mustang, the most common type
If you click on the seven thumbnails at the bottom of the page you can see other photos of it displaying the paint scheme shown in our Shorpy photo.
Here is the link... http://www.mustangsmustangs.com/p-51/?survivors/serial/44-74483
There is a ton of interesting stuff on this website for both Mustang cars and Mustang airplanes...
http://www.mustangsmustangs.com/
OwnerYes, I remember the owner's name was George Perez and he flew it often over the bay area when I was a kid.  Two memorable sightings stick with me.  One was just as we parked on Sloat Boulevard in San Francisco across from the zoo c1970.  I had just gotten out of the car when the "maroon and gold Mustang" raced over Ocean Beach at about 1,000 feet headed toward the Golden Gate.  The other time was when I was home sick from school, also c70, and the Mustang raced past our big front window up in the east bay hills, again low and fast.  My mother was setting my lunch tray down when the Mustang streaked past the house.  
Paint jobThanks to bobstothfang for the photo of the current paint job on the P51. Thank heaven it was repainted. That maroon and gold did the impossible...made that plane ugly!
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

He's Got A Ticket To Ride
... of two of my grandsons taken by me on the Boardwalk in Ocean City, New Jersey of a seemingly similar ride of similar vintage. In the ... 
 
Posted by billyboy - 08/31/2008 - 10:55pm -

Sixty years have gone by since my father took this picture of me at Riverview Beach Amusement Park, then a popular spot on the Delaware River in southern New Jersey.  A lot of things have changed since August 1948, but I still enjoy amusement rides. View full size.
Uninsured DriverWhen I was four or five I rode a carnival ride very much like this one, and the spoke attached to my car worked itself loose.  I was rear-ended before being lifted out by the frantic ride operator.  This was before we became such a litigious society.  I thought it was exciting.
Keeps Going, Going Going...Here is a shot of two of my grandsons taken by me on the Boardwalk in Ocean City, New Jersey of a seemingly similar ride of similar vintage.  In the amusement park industry rides get sold and resold, plus moved around, over the decades.

(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

Natchez at Nawlins: 1903
... cotton bale is a little bit bent, and compared with the ocean steamers in the background a wooden hull appears really antiquated. ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 08/17/2017 - 2:12pm -

The Mississippi River circa 1903. "Packet steamer Natchez at New Orleans." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.
Between the StacksAhhh ... the ever-present "official ensign" of a bale of cotton between the stacks of the Natchez family of steamboats!
Tourist Round Trips for six Bucks330 miles, including meals and berth. Where is the ticket office? I want be aboard. But the hull of the Matchez could take a new paint. On a closer look: The complete ship is a little bit getting old. The underside of the main deck (I did not know that the decks of Mississippi steamers were so far broader than the trunk) has lost several boards, the wire construction which holds the cotton bale is a little bit bent, and compared with the ocean steamers in the background a wooden hull appears really antiquated. Especially if the color of the hull is almost completely peeled off.
(The Gallery, Boats & Bridges, DPC, New Orleans)

Jimmy Doolittle
... destination. They were forced to ditch their bomber in the ocean off the China coast. Two men drowned in the process. The others were ... 
 
Posted by photosmapdi - 01/29/2008 - 9:19pm -

Major General Jimmy Doolittle (left) meeting with pilots somewhere in Italy (possibly Corsica) in 1942 or 1943.
CorsicaIf it is Corsica, it is France; if it is Italy it might be Sardinia.
Wife of Doolittle raiderA few months ago, I was waiting in my chiropractor's office and started talking to a nice lady in her 80s. I quickly learned that she was the second wife of Doolittle Raider, Lt. Chase Jay Nielson. Lt. Nielsen was the navigator on the sixth bomber to take off. After dropping their bombs, they ran out of fuel before they could get to their intended destination. They were forced to ditch their bomber in the ocean off the China coast. Two men drowned in the process.  The others were taken prisoner.  One man was executed, in front of his comrades, and one died of malnutrition and ill treatment. Of his crew, only Lt. Nielsen managed to survive three and a half years in Japanese captivity and was repatriated at the end of the war. He returned home to Utah, married and raised a family, and lived until 2007. Of course, no one who lived through such a thing was ever completely freed of it. 
I was honored to meet the sweet lady to was his companion in life, following the death of his first wife. I am posting a picture of the crew of bomber six. Lt. Nielsen is far left.
What are they looking at?  I guess we'll never know.  Perhaps a dog.
The photo probably was taken either in North Africa in 1943 or possibly in England in 1944.  He is a two star general here, promoted to that rank in November 1942.  If the photo was taken in Italy it would have been in the fall of 1943.  The Allies did not invade mainland Italy until September, though Sicily fell in mid-August.  Sardinia was taken in September, Corsica (French) not until October. Doolittle went to England to command 8th AF in January 1944.  He was promoted to lieutenant general in March.  
Chase Nielsen:
http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123046197
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

Dining at the Dunes: 1939
... a fresh seafood meal eaten with a panoramic view of the ocean while surrounded by salty air and soaring seagulls. Wish I was there. ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 09/23/2014 - 6:23pm -

Sept. 20, 1939. "The Dunes Club, Narragansett, Rhode Island. Dining porch. Purves, Cope & Stewart, architect." Shorpy has a group rate for the second seating at 9. See you there? 5x7 acetate negative by Gottscho-Schleisner. View full size.
LunchWe'll start with a half-dozen clamcakes, and chowdah all around. (CLEAR chowdah. Not white, not red, but CLEAR. This is Rhode Island) Then we'll have some steamiz. And then maybe a coffee cabinet for dessert.
Oceanside diningI'm ready to order.  I'll start with a cup of R. I. clam chowder, then have the special shore dinner sampler.  This place is still in existence as an exclusive "members only" private club.  Few things taste better than a fresh seafood meal eaten with a panoramic view of the ocean while surrounded by salty air and soaring seagulls.  Wish I was there.
(The Gallery, Eateries & Bars, Gottscho-Schleisner)

RMS Mauretania 1906
... of a beautiful ship. Considered by many to be the greatest ocean liner ever built. She sailed like clockwork for nearly 29 years and was ... 
 
Posted by Pegsco - 02/06/2008 - 2:57pm -

My grandfather came to America aboard this beautiful ship in 1913 through Ellis Island.
Lusitania's Fortunate SisterBeautiful picture of a beautiful ship. Considered by many to be the greatest ocean liner ever built. She sailed like clockwork for nearly 29 years and was the fastest ship afloat for most of her career. She was scrapped in 1935 despite the fact she could have run for many more years. Her owners felt she was too dated. Coincidentally the Olympic (sister ship to ill fated Titanic) was laid up concurrently at the same pier and scrapped along with the Mauretania. In retrospect it's a shame someone didn't have the foresight to save these two beautiful, historical ships. 
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

Nuova Venezia: 1907
... Nearby View One year later, about a mile north at Ocean Park Pier. My great-grandfather George D. DeMartini on his wedding day in ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 07/10/2018 - 9:51am -

Venice, California, circa 1907. "View of the Abbot Kinney Pier showing auditorium, Ship Cafe and dance hall." 5x7 inch dry plate glass negative. View full size.
Nearby ViewOne year later, about a mile north at Ocean Park Pier. My great-grandfather George D. DeMartini on his wedding day in 1908. I am told on some authority that a very good time was had by all.
Surfin' Board USA?California water people may know: Is that an early American version of literal boards used for surfing by the two folks in the water (and did everyone along the shore lose their class rings at the same time or are they all clamming)?
(The Gallery, Boats & Bridges, DPC, Swimming)

Biloxi Bakery Circa 1930
... For over sixty years it supplied the Biloxi - Gulfport - Ocean Springs areas with fresh baked goods. Fred Klein Sr., the founder, claims ... 
 
Posted by FredKlein - 08/05/2007 - 12:04am -

Three delivery trucks in front of the Biloxi Bakery and Confectioneries. known by the locals as simply Klein's. For over sixty years it supplied the Biloxi - Gulfport - Ocean Springs areas with fresh baked goods. Fred Klein Sr., the founder, claims when he left New Orleans at the turn of the century, they forgot how to make REAL french bread ... He had backup for his claims as some of the deliveries were made to New Orleans!  His bread was even flown to California and New York when visiting dignitaries from the local air base were in town!
New Orleans style French breadLooking at all of these pictures from the Biloxi Bakery, and reading the captions, has made me very hungry! I'd love some New Orleans style French bread, right now!
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

Keep 'Em Sailing: 1942
... production worker, who has never seen a battleship or an ocean, fashions the steel hull parts which are being assembled at Mare Island ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 04/05/2017 - 5:53pm -

May 1942. "Twenty-four hours a day the sparks from acetylene torches of steel workers in eight Denver fabricating plants are flying thick and fast that the U.S. Navy may carry the battle to the enemy in all parts of the world. Here in secluded Denver, the world's largest city not on a navigable waterway, this war production worker, who has never seen a battleship or an ocean, fashions the steel hull parts which are being assembled at Mare Island Navy Yard in California -- 1,200 miles from where he and his fellow workers are on the job to help 'keep 'em sailing'." Office of War Information, photographer unknown. View full size.
Straight edgeBeing a welder trainer  I like this photo because the photo shows that the man cutting the steel is using a piece of square stock as a straight edge to guide the torch tip on a straight line. A good burner knows to always pull the torch close than to push the torch away. although his feet are in the line of fire this is something difficult to avoid when torching by hand.
(The Gallery, Factories, WW2)

The New Olds: 1927
... Roadster were Sea Fog Gray for the main body color, with Ocean Blue fenders, hood and the top of the body, and Burnt Orange striping. ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 09/07/2016 - 3:39pm -

San Francisco, 1927. "Oldsmobile roadster at Golden Gate Park." Latest listing in the Shorpy Catalogue of Jaunty Jalopies. 5x7 glass negative. View full size.
Four Wheel BrakesThe 30 X 5.25 inch tires indicate that this Olds was built in or after January, 1927 and included four wheel brakes as standard equipment.  Surprisingly, there was no price increase with this new safety feature.
The car shown is the Model 30-E roadster, and they could only be ordered with the deluxe trim package which included the front and rear bumpers, a locking motometer and dogbone radiator cap, and the option of body-colored steel disc wheels or wooden spoke wheels.  Olds produced 2,474, including the 132 exported, it weighed 2,317 pounds, and it was priced at $975.  All of the open cars made had black pebble grained leather upholstery.  Unlike the coupes, the golf club door on the passenger side was not a standard feature.
The standard colors for the 1927 Deluxe Roadster were Sea Fog Gray for the main body color, with Ocean Blue fenders, hood and the top of the body, and Burnt Orange striping.  Other colors were optionally available.  Late in the model year other paint variations were offered including an extra wide stripe at the top of the doors.
The images below are from factory photos and a color image from a Oldsmobile brochure.  Note the interesting side curtain shape needed, and the small covered area built-in to it where you could stick your arm and hand out to signal turns.
(The Gallery, Cars, Trucks, Buses, Chris Helin, San Francisco)

La Grande Duchesse: 1901
... full size. Ship of aliases In November 1901, Ocean Steamship Co. acquired and renamed her the City of Savannah as she plied ... 
 
Posted by Dave - 10/29/2018 - 8:51pm -

        One of six vessels sunk off the Atlantic coast by a German U-boat on the so-called "Black Sunday" of June 2, 1918.
Circa 1901. "S.S. La Grande Duchesse -- Plant Line steamship." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Photographic Company. View full size.
Ship of aliases In November 1901, Ocean Steamship Co. acquired and renamed her the City of Savannah as she plied the route between New York and Charleston. She became part of the New York and Porto Rico Steamship fleet in January 1906 and was now known as the Carolina.
The captain of the U-151 allowed the crew and passengers to abandon ship before he sank her with shellfire. Most were rescued even though the lifeboats had to endure a squall that night. Only eight passengers and five crew were lost, possibly when their motor dory was swamped. Not a lucky ship as she had numerous mechanical issues and survived a 1913 collision with the liner Cleveland in New York Harbor.
(The Gallery, Boats & Bridges, DPC)

Vacationland USA: 1966
... press, but US 50 is the great unsung cross-country route, Ocean City to Sacramento. (ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery, tterrapix) ... 
 
Posted by tterrace - 09/12/2018 - 2:45pm -

Actually, Lower Echo Lake, a body of water about seven miles south of Lake Tahoe as the crow flies. We didn't actually make use of the lake on our 1966 vacation, just popped in for a look (and for me to take this Kodachrome slide) as we headed home down US 50 after a visit to Virginia City. View full size.
TranscontinentalApropos of nothing, as they say: As I write this I am sitting 600 feet away from US Route 50 in Maryland. US 66 gets all the press, but US 50 is the great unsung cross-country route, Ocean City to Sacramento.
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery, tterrapix)

USS New York Burial at Sea
... man done to deserve being dumped into the cruel and lonely ocean, like the ultimate outcast? (ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery) ... 
 
Posted by William Christen - 07/26/2010 - 7:54am -

The recent Shorpy photographs taken on the USS New York. (armored cruiser CA-2) have been of a lighter nature. The following anonymous snapshots are in my collection. They were taken on the USS New York (see the "NY" on the lifeboat in image 4). The images were likely taken between 1898 and 1905. They are numbered on the images as No. 86 through No. 94 -- perhaps indicating a larger series of photographs taken on one of the ships many cruises from 1893 through 1911.
These images  show the most solemn of Naval ceremonies -- a burial at sea. In this image the honor guard is securing a US Flag around the canvas wrapped corpse. View full size
Jeez, What A Terrible Way To Enter EternityPersonally I've always considered burial at sea the most cruel, depressing and needless of all death customs.
The person is thrown into the cold, dark roiling sea, an environment totally alien and deadly to human beings, and left to spend eternity completely alone there. You might as well shoot a loved one out into space.  Nothing to mark his resting place either and no way to get there or find it if you wanted to.
Not even to take his place in a cemetery among the dead of his fellow man, in the warm and familiar bed of the sunlit earth and grass and rain, or to have ones ashes scattered over a peaceful and bucolic place, perhaps at ones beloved birthplace or near other loved ones.
What has any man done to deserve being dumped into the cruel and lonely ocean, like the ultimate outcast?
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

No Soap, No Girls: 1960
... bathyscaphe Trieste descended to the deepest part of the ocean in January 1960, I made a "copy" out of cardboard boxes, cellophane and ... 
 
Posted by Islander800 - 04/20/2018 - 8:01pm -

After the bathyscaphe Trieste descended to the deepest part of the ocean in January 1960, I made a "copy" out of cardboard boxes, cellophane and marker pens Dad brought home from work. That's me as a nine-year-old explorer at the window. View full size.
No Girls!Quite possibly an official branch of the "He-Man Woman Haters Club".
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

Royals run the slide
... and his wife, the future Queen Mary, after whom the ocean liner, The Queen Mary, was named. By braving the slide, the Royal couple ... 
 
Posted by Mark J - 12/27/2009 - 9:07pm -

The Duke and Duchess of York braving the timber slide at Ottawa during their 1901 tour of the British Empire.  Seated on the crib are the future King George V (who preferred being at home tending his stamp collection), and his wife, the future Queen Mary, after whom the ocean liner, The Queen Mary, was named.  By braving the slide, the Royal couple passed a Canadian test for “pluck”.  The couple’s eldest son would become Edward VIII in 1936, abdicating before the year was out.
Alfred George Pittaway Photographic Studio, 58 Sparks Street, Ottawa. View full size.
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)

So Cal Fishing Barge, 1958
... Southern California. Some of barges were anchored in the ocean and some were tethered at the end of a pier. This is obviously one of the ... 
 
Posted by Rute Boye - 08/31/2012 - 8:46pm -

When my brother and I were kids my grandfather would take us fishing on one of the many fishing barges off the coast of Southern California. Some of barges were anchored in the ocean and some were tethered at the end of a pier. This is obviously one of the tethered versions, but exactly which one I'm not sure. As far as I know, the last of these barges, possibly the one off Redondo Beach, was sunk in the 1980s as an artificial reef. Judging from the number of fishermen lined up at the pier, the fish must have really been biting! 
I have a distinct memory of us trying to reel in the mackerel & bonito, and having big sharks swim up and steal our fish right at the edge of the hull. I also have a distinct memory of the barge captain shooting the thieving sharks with a .30-06 Springfield rifle. I rather doubt that this would be legal today! View full size.
(ShorpyBlog, Member Gallery)
Syndicate content  Shorpy.com is a vintage photography site featuring thousands of high-definition images. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago. Contact us | Privacy policy | Accessibility Statement | Site © 2024 Shorpy Inc.