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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • EAT MORE FISH, 1917

Rochester Panorama: 1905

Rochester Panorama: 1905

Rochester, New York, ca. 1905. Panorama of three 8x10 plates. View full size.

 

More about Holy Redeemer

As part of its effort to unburden itself of urban church buildings, the Roman Catholic Diocese tried to demolish this gorgeous building in the late 1980s, but the Landmark Society worked successfully to prevent that. At the time, a poor person in the neighborhood said, "It's the only beautiful thing we have to look at around here. Don't take it away from us." The Diocese then had to sell the building.

Great view

Thanks, Dave, for the correction on the status of the former Holy Redeemer Church.
This view was likely photographed from atop the Powers Bldg., (seen here: http://www.shorpy.com/node/5492) which still stands at the NW corner of Main & State. At the time of the photo, the Powers Bldg. was the city's tallest. View is looking east. East Main Street is clearly visible below, with its streetcars and tracks. Notice that East Main's bridge crossing the Genesee River is lined on both sides by buildings (seen here: http://www.shorpy.com/node/11122) - restoring the view of the river was one good thing accomplished by 1960's urban renewal. The tall building on the left side of East Main is the Granite Bldg., which survived a major fire the year before and still stands on the NE corner of East Main & St. Paul Streets. The tall building on the right side of East Main is the Commerce Bldg., which survived until 1980, when it was imploded (controlled demolition) one Sunday morning to make way for the Rochester Riverside Convention Center.

Fuel for Hayburners

Note the large load of hay going across the bridge at left, brought in from outside Suburbia to supply the livery stables of the metropolis.

The automobiles on the major thoroughfare at right will make such a delivery obsolete within a few years, but for now, the "horseless carriages" are content to share the road with the buggies, wagons, carriages and draycarts that make up the city's traffic.

Cox Building at 36 St Paul Street

Never realized the building had a more extensive frontage on St Paul Street at one time. The right hand portion of the Romanesque Revival building that appears to be only a facade in the panorama was eventually torn down and replaced with something more modern.

Sign painters

You'd think a sign company would care enough to make better-looking lettering on their biggest ad in the city! (The two S's in "SIGNS" don't even look the same! Not to mention that I first read it as "Roghester Sign Company.")

Distinctive Church

The distinctive church with two onion-shaped spires in the distance, left of the center of the photo, still stands. It's on the northeast corner of Hudson Ave. & Clifford Ave. I believe it's now vacant and its unique architecture is in danger of being lost.

[Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, restored in 1988 and now the Northside Church of Christ. Not vacant. - Dave]

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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