SHORPY Historic Photo Archive & Fine-Art Prints
 
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About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • MARS SNOOPER, 1959

Mexia, Texas Oilfield: 1940

Mexia, Texas Oilfield: 1940

My grandfather W. C. Holloway (1905-1979) is at the far right. He worked for Humble Oil Co. and retired in 1960. View full size.

Great-Grandfather's Building: 1931

Great-Grandfather's Building: 1931

My great-grandfather Napoleon Senecal's building at 3520 Sherbrooke Street East, Montreal, Quebec, Canada in 1931. View full size.

Port of Teepookana: 1898

Port of Teepookana: 1898

Frederick O. Henry, the short and bearded Scotsman standing fourth from left, made a fortune in the early mining days of the Tasmanian West Coast. My children are his great-great-grandchildren. Behind is the steam from a boat that linked the river port of Teepookana to the sea port of Strahan. Strahan flourishes today as a tourist destination. Teepookana is overgrown by the forest. This professional photograph by J. Mills of Zeehan comes from the F. O. Henry family archive. View full size.

The Delegation: 1898

The Delegation: 1898

Many ships were lost in the early days at the notorious "Hells Gates" entrance to Maquarie Harbour, Tasmania. This delegation likely led to the construction of the sea training wall to improve the entrance that still exists today. Frederick Ormiston Henry, my children's great-great-grandfather, is standing fourth from the right. The harbour is named in honour of Scottish Major General Lachlan Macquarie, the fifth Colonial Governor of New South Wales. This harbour was the location of the brutal convict settlement of Sarah Island. The waterway is famous today for its salmon farming. From F. O. Henry's personal archives. View full size.

Driveway Stroll: 1963

Driveway Stroll: 1963

My mother thought it was funny how my baby brother fell asleep in his stroller, so she posed me with it and took this picture. The date is early 1963, around six months after we moved into our new Princeton, New Jersey house.
Like in Levittown, my family were the original owners, though unlike Levittown, these were custom-built homes. You selected your lot, then selected a blueprint from the library of blueprints that the builder had. The blueprint was just a starting point. You then edited those basic plans. In our case we added footage to the garage to fit our 1960 Edsel, because the garage, as drawn in the plans, was shorter than the car. Closet configurations were another thing my mother totally customized.

The just-completed, though not yet occupied house across the street stands starkly in the background with its not-yet-grown landscape and bare lawn area. As for me, I seem to be stoically putting up with my mother’s photography.”Say cheese” was not a phrase in my family’s vocabulary.

How Many Strollers Does One Child Need: 1957

How Many Strollers Does One Child Need: 1957

One of the things you find out in editing your family pictures for sharing on Shorpy are the strange things you never thought of when you were growing up. My family seems to have had “a thing” about carriages and strollers, both real and for play. In this picture, which shows me in the foreground using my potty chair as a regular chair and playing with a pound-a-peg bench, there are two play strollers behind me. A tin lithographed one is standing upright, and a steel frame and fabric one is turned over on the floor. Other pictures show me climbing into a carriage, and wheeling it on the sidewalk, and wheeling a dog in the stroller that is on the floor in this picture.

I remember a fourth woody wagon carriage from the 1940's that I have not found a picture of. And then there are the numerous pictures of me or my brother in carriages or strollers, and even one of my family using one with my brother at the kitchen table in place of a high chair. Why did I have so many strollers and carriages and why are there so many pictures including them? I have no clue.

My Mother During the War

My Mother During the War

I have often referred to my mother working and living in Washington, D.C. during the war in my comments on the many great photos Shorpy posts from that era. She was from Ohio but moved to D.C. to work for the CAA (Civil Aeronautics Authority) which was the forerunner of today's FAA. I found this picture of her in her office from 1943 and thought it would fit right in here. She would have turned 100 this year, so she is 25 in this picture. View full size.

110 Dogwood Drive: 1959

110 Dogwood Drive: 1959

My mother did not allow “wasting film” on pictures of cars. Film was meant to be wasted on pictures of clothes. So, when she bought me my first raincoat for the spring of 1959, she had me dress up in my boots and that yellow slicker, and pose on the porch that my father had added to the front of our first home in Levittown, Pennsylvania.

As a picture of a smirking kid in a too-big raincoat, so the sleeves have to be folded up, it is kind of lame. But it is one of only two pictures of our 1952 Studebaker Commander, which is the car sticking out of the carport behind me. That car meant the world to me because in deepest, darkest suburbia, nothing ever happened unless you got in the car. It took you to the drive-in movie, and Dairy Delite ice cream. Home was boring. Cars were exciting.

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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