SHORPY Historic Photo Archive & Fine-Art Prints
 
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About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • CHRISTMAS PRINTS

Howie and the Belvedere: 195x

Howie and the Belvedere: 195x

My father (left) chats with his brother-in-law Abe, who was the husband of his oldest sister, in a set of Adirondack chairs, blocking full view of a perfectly lovely, two-tone, 1956 Plymouth Belvedere. I haven’t a clue who owned the Plymouth. We had a 1952 Studebaker at that time. Abe lived in a New York City apartment that had no place to park a car. Location is probably some Catskills resort hotel. Date is late 1950's.

Get This Boy Away From Me: 1957

Get This Boy Away From Me: 1957

I am the three-year-old child overly bundled up in the red snow suit and trying to get away from the older boy (who was a son of my father’s sister). He kept pushing my cheeks together to give me a funny face, and I kept trying to stop him. But the star of this photo is a 1956 Chrysler parked on his New York City Street that we happen to be blocking. Why, oh, why couldn’t we have been standing three feet further back to give us a better view of the car?

My First Car: 1957

My First Car: 1957

My first car was a 1952 Studebaker Commander because that is the car my parents drove me home from the hospital in after I was born in 1954. It was the only car my family had until November of 1959. It was a four door sedan with the new V8 engine (that had debuted in the 1951 bullet nose version of this car) and a heater. Every other option available for this car was declined: no radio, carpets, wheel covers, decorative trim. It had only a manual transmission. Plus it never had a garage. This Levittown, Pennsylvania carport was as close as it came. By the time my father sold it to some neighborhood teenager in 1962 it had chrome pits the size of cat teeth.

Here you see me (center child) and two playmates, our “gorgeous” zinc plated trash cans, kitchen door, my baby stroller, and my big, black car.

Dodge Dart in Haverford PA: 1968

Dodge Dart in Haverford PA: 1968

My mother took this picture of eighth-grade me and my first-grade brother at our front driveway in Haverford, Pennsylvania. To her it was a picture of her son and daughter. To me it is a picture of our 1967 Dodge Dart. Like when he bought the Studebaker, my father went through the options book with the dealer and had them make exactly what he wanted. Then we waited six weeks for the bespoke car to be built. So it was every bit as much of a dog as his first try at this special order stuff.

Rubber mats again instead of carpets, 6-cylinder engine, no decorative trim. No wheel covers or whitewall tires. He did allow it to have a radio (AM only, no tape player) automatic transmission and air conditioner. (To be fair my father was practical, not stingy. Pretty served no purpose. AC and heat did). Color was gold. When it came time to get rid of it, fifteen or so years later, he called me up and asked me if I wanted it. Though I usually took the family cast-off cars, in this case I said “no!”

Uncle Dave's Dodge: 195x

Uncle Dave's Dodge: 195x

My great-uncle Dave Tunnel, in a mid-1950s Kodachrome taken near Norwalk, Ohio. He's proudly displaying his 1953 Dodge Coronet. View full size.

Andrea with Iden: 1963

Andrea with Iden: 1963

The same roll of film that my Aunt Harriet snapped the portrait of the sewing room included a portrait of me and my brother on a rocking chair in the living room. My then two-year-old brother Iden seems somewhat perturbed by this unfamiliar woman taking his picture, which may be why I am holding his hand-- to assure him that everything was okay, so he wouldn’t run away. View full size.

Sewing Room: 1963

Sewing Room: 1963

My mother’s sister Harriet came to visit our new house in Princeton, New Jersey and took a whole roll of 35mm film featuring our family and the new rooms we had. In this portrait of the sewing room my mother placed me in front of her to show off the jumper and blouse she had designed and made. The strange looking pocket on it was apparently a concession to my taste. I liked having pockets, so she knew that if she designed outfits with big pockets I would wear them. The jumper was tan velveteen and it looks like there were dinosaurs on the shirt. On her lapel is a gold-tone scatter pin that I loved. I do not remember if it was a cat or mouse, but it had a jointed tail that hung down and would swing.

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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