SHORPY Historic Photo Archive & Fine-Art Prints
 
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Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
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About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • JOIN U.S. CROP CORPS, WWII

Economy Run: 1962

Economy Run: 1962

My dad entered and often won economy runs with his MG Midget. He would modify it for the events and then convert it back to his daily driver. Mansfield, Ohio 1962. View full size.

TV and Me: 1955

TV and Me: 1955

In a previous picture I mentioned our family TV. But in that picture, the doors to it were closed, making it into a piece of blonde wood, mid-century modern furniture. It was a 1951 model RCA Kendall 17T174. We only had RCA TVs because my father worked at RCA Laboratories, in Princeton New Jersey, where he was involved in the development of color television. His slippers are on the floor behind me. To the right of them is a wheeled piece of blonde wood furniture that my mother called a tea wagon. Behind them all is a closer look at the very fifties fabric of the curtains my mother sewed for that living room. View full size.

Piper's Opera House: 1966

Piper's Opera House: 1966

This time I was almost literally in Arthur Rothstein's footsteps when I took my Kodachrome slide of Virginia City's Piper's Opera House in August 1966, 26 years and some months after he was clicking his shutter. Had my family been there for him as they were for me, my father would have been 38, my mother 31 and my brother 2 going on 3. It would be another six years before they would be blessed by my existence. The photobombing International Scout wasn't the family car; our new Rambler wagon was parked some blocks away. View full size.

St. Mary in the Mountains: 1966

St. Mary in the Mountains: 1966

Unknowingly channeling Arthur Rothstein in Virginia City once more, I was a bit closer than he'd been to St. Mary in the Mountains Church when I took this Kodachrome slide in August 1966, and also got my mother, brother and, mostly hidden by him, my father, heading that way. I don't remember us going into the church, but another photo shows we'd parked a couple blocks down in that direction. View full size.

Back to School: 1965

Back to School: 1965

When I took this Kodachrome slide of Virginia City's Fourth Ward School building in August 1965 I had never heard of Arthur Rothstein, much less realized I was following in his footsteps a quarter century after he took this photograph. Other things I didn't know then was that a neighbor in Larkspur had once lived, worked and met Ulysses S. Grant here, or that exactly one year later I'd be back with my family and our new Rambler. View full size.

Real Live Doll: 1962

Real Live Doll: 1962

The best thing about getting a baby brother is all the things you can do with him. In this case, eight-year-old me and two other neighborhood girls dressed him up in doll clothes on the floor of my mother’s sewing room. The green plaid dress he is wearing was sewn by my mother for Cutie Pie, a life-sized fabric doll she made for me when I was three.

Playing Dolls: 1959

Playing Dolls: 1959

Every little girl is given dolls to play with. I was as car-crazy at age five as I am now. I would have loved to play with toy cars. But I was not given any, even when I asked for them. Which doesn’t mean I didn’t like playing with dolls too.

I named this doll “Sunrise Tomato Juice.” It was given to me by Mrs. Betty Shaeffer, who lived next door in the year 1959. The Shaeffers had no children so she delighted in visits from me. And I loved going over to her house where I played with her dog, cat, and copied things she did. She put on hand cream (my mother didn’t do that). She had a silk comforter on her bed. I made my mother buy me a comforter just like it, though my mother bought me nylon, not silk. She also saved the bright red boxes she got at a store called The Hitching Post, which was in the Levittown Shoparama, to give to me. (My mother did not like Hitching Post. She said it was overpriced).

Exactly what concept I had, piling up all those phone books, Sears catalogs, and papers for the doll to sit on top of, I can not fathom, now that I am an adult, any more than I can understand why I gave the doll such a stupid name.

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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