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Detroit Rubber Works: 1908

Detroit Rubber Works: 1908

Detroit, Michigan, 1908. "Detroit Rubber Works." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.

 

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Uni, Roy & Al

Uni, Roy & Al say "Cook with Gas".

What did they make?

Bet they made some Baby Buggy Bumpers.

Story in dBusiness Magazine this Month

I just read a story about them/Uniroyal in the Jan/Feb 2012 issue of dBusiness magazine (a Detroit business periodical).

Not even a rubber band can be found there today.

[Area immediately southwest of MacArthur Bridge Park.]


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Strange Photo

It looks like something painted by Edward Hopper.

Morgan & Wright's Wartime Women

During World War I, Morgan & Wright hired many women to fill essential production jobs previously held by men. Here's a photo from the collection of Wayne State University. Amelia Bloomer and Parisian fashion designers usually get the credit for introducing women to wearing trousers, but it's likely that more American women got to experience this for the first time during their temporary wartime jobs.

What do they manufacture?

Vulcanized, galoshes and boots, rubber bands, or condoms?

[Hmm. Detroit? Rubber? Morgan & Wright was the world's largest maker of bicycle tires when, in 1906, they moved from Chicago to Detroit to exploit the needs of the growing automobile industry. In 1911 the company was sold to the U.S. Rubber Co., renamed Uniroyal in 1961.]

Cookin' With Gas

Great view of a gasometer complete with promotional message on it.

I found the steam whistle!

Just to the left of the two "smoking" smoke stacks.

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