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Reconstruction: 1890s

Reconstruction: 1890s

Vicksburg, Mississippi, circa 1890s. "Pemberton's Headquarters." John C. Pemberton (U.S.A., C.S.A., 1814-1881) was the Confederate general noted for his surrender in the Siege of Vicksburg. 8x10 inch glass negative. View full size.

 

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It is indeed the same place

I visited Vicksburg a few years ago and went to that house and it is indeed the same structure, though as mentioned before, it's been through some major reno(s) since then.

Nice carriage, hungry horses

From the way their ribs are showing, the horses' owner should have spent a little less on the carriage and a little more on hay and oats.

The pole

What are those wires coming off the tall pole on the left of the photo? They don't seem to be for stabilizing/support.

[Telephone or telegraph, before they fell down. - Dave]

Out-of-Towners

I am curious as to how far this was from town. I see a tent to the right. Temporary housing for the workers?

As to what the hansom driver is doing: he's asking the man on the hill how much longer he's gonna be.

Mrs. Cowan's house

In 1890 the residence was deeded to Mary Frances Cowan, and was thereafter known as the Willis-Cowan House.

https://www.nps.gov/vick/learn/historyculture/pembertons-headquarters.ht...

"In 1890 it was purchased by Mrs. M.F. Cowan, the wife of one of the men who helped develop the underwater torpedo that was used by the Confederates to sink the USS Cairo."

http://www.civilwaralbum.com/vicksburg/willis_cowan1.htm

I wonder if that is Mrs. Cowan overseeing some restoration on the old place?

Quite the makeover

Assuming it is indeed the same place, it's hardly recognizable in its current form:

Which way's he headed?

Handsome coach, but what's the driver doing?

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