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Sea Breeze: 1910

Sea Breeze: 1910

The Jersey Shore circa 1910. "Casino and boardwalk, Asbury Park, N.J." 5x7 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.

 

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Historical Account of Asbury Park Casino

This Casino was destroyed by fire in 1928 and was rebuilt the following year with much of it still in existence. Convention Hall was also built in 1929. The Asbury Casino thrived with businesses and amusements until the Boardwalk shutdown in 1986. The amusements continued to operate on a seasonal part time weekend basis until around 1990 when then becoming entirely vacant. The east end of the Asbury Casino was demolished around 2007 with the intention of reconstructing it to its former appearance with restoring the whole building. The Market Meltdown of 2008 thwarted those plans. The Casino suffered considerable damage with Hurricane Sandy in 2012. Some improvements have been made but obstacles continue progress including the current Covid-19 epidemic we are now facing.

Sad story

This casino burned down in 1929 or so. The one that replaced it fell into ruin, along with a lot else, after the 1970 riots. It is only now being restored.

Weapons-grade hatpins

Ladies anchored their hats with hatpins that could double as personal protective devices. I'm not sure how men did it - men's hats generally sit lower on the head, and small-brimmed hats were fashionable at the time of this picture, so the combination of friction and poor aerodynamics may have sufficed to keep a gentleman's headgear in its place.

How do they do it?

Given the way those flags are waving, how do those folks keep their hats on their heads?

More segregated than Dixie

Not a Black face to be seen.

Clams for Dinner?

Rockin' the shades and ready for digging.

This has a pulse

Something surreal going on here, bordering on the sublime.

Tempus fugit

It's amazing to see the boardwalk in Asbury Park when it was crowded and lively. When I was stationed at Fort Monmouth in 1974, I paid the town a visit, and the casino was in sad shape and the boardwalk was deserted.

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