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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • WE CAN DO IT! BUT FIRST, COFFEE

Sunday Skoal: 1941

Sunday Skoal: 1941

August 1941. "Farm boys in beer parlor on Sunday afternoon. Finnish community of Bruce Crossing, Michigan." Photo by John Vachon for the Farm Security Administration. View full size.

 

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Familiar face

At first glance I thought that was a young Johnny Carson. I remember those Gripmasters. I'd do well to be able to put the penny in it now.

Blue Law Sunday?

What is hidden behind that cloth on the back of the bar? Did the blue laws state that hard liquor couldn't be sold and had to be hidden on Sundays?

First step to becoming hep

I remember the belt buckles being worn like the fellow on the right. One of my cousins wore his that way too and he also had taps on his shoes (we always called them cleats ... a Baltimore thing??). I bet the guy in the picture also has taps.

Repeater

One of those Yoopers has been here before.

https://www.shorpy.com/node/25973

Raised canes

It seems like an odd habit to store canes on the antlers.
I that some tradition that I don't know about?

Sisu with a little uff da too, eh?

At first glance I thought that this might be a Michigan bar, maybe tipped by the antlers & Stroh's Beer sign. All of the men look at least a little like my late Uncle Otto, hence Finnish. Therefore, a Yooper bar.

Belt, no cap

I believe we have a handsome rake in this Finnish community beer parlor on a Sunday afternoon.

Gottleib Grip Tester

The coin-operated machine at the far left of the counter is a Gottleib Grip Tester. Drop a penny and either pull the two halves of the grip together, or push them apart. See how strong you are -- compete with your friends. Easy money for the bar owner. (Photo lifted off the web -- my grip tester is long gone.)

Raising Helsinki

You knew somebody was gonna say it ...

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